Beck's Blog

From Our Family Farm to Yours

18

May

2017

Agronomy Update

Assessing Flood Damaged Corn

Earlier this week I spent some time assessing what's left of our flooded corn fields in Southern Illinois.

This particular field saw a foot of rain and had standing water up to 3 ft. that stood in some spots for up to five days. 

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Categories: Agronomy, S Illinois

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17

May

2017

Agronomy Update

Soybean Pythium Seedling Blight

Author: Chad Kalaher

While scouting fields these past few weeks I have spotted some presence of soybean Pythium seedling blight across east central Illinois as a result of the cold, wet conditions we have experienced.  

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16

May

2017

Agronomy Update

The Benefits of Water Management

There is no better time to experience the benefits of water management than after a big rainfall event. And Beck’s PFR site in Effingham, IL experienced 7.25 in. of rain over the course of a week.

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Categories: Agronomy, PFR, PFR Reports

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15

May

2017

Agronomy Update

Wheat Update from Southwest Kentucky

Author: Austin Scott

Back in March, a majority of my territory experienced a freeze event. And while our wheat grew out of it and was looking very healthy, we are now seeing some damage.   

 

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Categories: Agronomy, Kentucky, Tennessee

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12

May

2017

Agronomy Update

PPO Injury on Soybeans

Author: Craig Kilby

Join field agronomist and herbicide specialist, Craig Kilby, at Beck’s Downs IL PFR site as he evaluates recent issues that have occurred as a result of a pre-emergent herbicide application over the top of soybeans.

The soybeans in this field were planted on April 19 and April 20 followed by a herbicide application that was applied over the top the next day. While PPO herbicides are effective and a great option for many herbicide platforms, they can cause injury on soybeans. Check out the video to learn more.

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11

May

2017

Agronomy Update

Corn Frost Injury in Ohio

Author: Luke Schulte

How will our corn yield be impacted by the frost event we had on Monday morning? We are seeing some symptomology of frost injury at Beck's PFR site in Ohio but most of it is cosmetic and our crops should grow out of it.

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Categories: Agronomy, Ohio

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8

May

2017

Agronomy Update

Hurry Up and Wait

Author: Mark Apelt

Many areas of Ohio turned dry towards the end of April and farmers were able to get their corn and soybeans into the ground at a good pace. In fact, the USDA projected that 42 percent of all corn and 14 percent of soybeans had been planted by April 30, 2017. Then…everything came to a screeching halt as frequent rainstorms have resulted in several inches of rain covering most of the state. 

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1

May

2017

Agronomy Update

Too Much Rain? What Now?

Author: Austin Scott

Many parts of Indiana, Missouri, and Kentucky have received over 4 in. of rain in a very short amount of time which has caused severe flooding in some areas. Because of this, I have received a number of questions from farmers wondering how long corn can survive under water and how much of their nitrogen (N) will still be there when the water finally recedes.

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Categories: Agronomy, Kentucky, Tennessee

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28

Apr

2017

Agronomy Update

Preventing Fusarium Head Scab in Your Wheat

Author: Steve Gauck

Scouting your wheat now is critical to preventing Fusarium head scab in your fields. Get to know and understand the wheat growth stages and timing and be prepared to apply fungicide when necessary.

 

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19

Apr

2017

Agronomy Update

To Plant or Not to Plant

Author: Luke Schulte

With the nice weather we are currently experiencing, many farmers find themselves asking the question, “should I be planting?” Here are a few factors to consider when answering that question.

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Categories: Agronomy, Ohio

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12

Apr

2017

Agronomy Update

April Planting Updates

Author: Jon Skinner

With planting just days away, now is a great time to look over your final planting details to ensure you are setting yourself up for maximum yield potential with the upcoming crop. Becks Practical Farm Research (PFR)® continues to provide us with unbiased guidelines and insights to help maximize yield and return on investment (ROI) on every acre.

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12

Apr

2017

Agronomy Update

Wheat Head Scab Updates

Author: Austin Scott

Much of the wheat throughout my territory is now between Feekes 10 (head in boot) and Feekes 10.1 (grain head visible). This means that within the next two weeks, it will be time to start making fungicide applications to protect our wheat against Fusarium head blight (head scab).

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12

Apr

2017

Agronomy Update

Burndown Options, Planting Behind Anhydrous Ammonia and Black Cutworm

Author: Luke Schulte

As we prepare for planting, there are a number of things to keep in mind. From burndown to weed and pest control, there are factors to consider that will ultimately affect the season ahead.  

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5

Apr

2017

Agronomy Update

Early Planting in 2017

Author: Steve Gauck

Over the past few weeks, many farmers have called me jokily asking, “is it too early to plant?”

My answers always seem to be long, with a lot of details and factors, as I try to help them determine if it is or isn’t too early. With that said, let’s look at our ideal planting dates and things you need to consider before planting.

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3

Apr

2017

Agronomy Update

What are Inoculants and Should I Use Them?

Author: Austin Scott

Do you know what the most abundant element in the air is? It’s not oxygen. It’s not hydrogen. It’s actually nitrogen (N). That’s right, one of the biggest input costs on your farm is actually floating around in the air you’re breathing. But since it’s a diatomic molecule (N2=gas), your corn crop can’t access it. Therefore, you have to buy and apply it to your crop. Soybeans, on the other hand, are legumes which means they can capture that free-floating N gas and, with the help of some soil microbes, convert it to a usable form of N.

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Categories: Agronomy, Kentucky, Tennessee

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23

Mar

2017

Agronomy Update

WHEAT FOLLOW-UP WITH Sean Nettleton: ASSESSING FREEZE DAMAGE

Beck’s agronomist, Sean Nettleton, provides an update to last week’s wheat webinar on freeze damage.

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23

Mar

2017

Agronomy Update

Wheat Follow-up with Austin Scott: Assessing Freeze Damage

Author: Austin Scott

Beck’s agronomist, Austin Scott, provides an update to last week’s wheat webinar on freeze damage.

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23

Mar

2017

Agronomy Update

Wheat Follow-up with Chad Kalaher: Assessing Freeze Damage

Author: Chad Kalaher

Beck’s agronomist, Chad Kalaher, provides an update to last week’s wheat webinar on freeze damage.

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14

Mar

2017

Agronomy Update

Optimum Missouri Planting Dates

Author: Alex Long

We are midway through March and have experienced some above average temperatures that have left many of us feeling as though our corn planters should be running. We have actually heard a few reports of corn being planted around the state, but I believe it is in your best interest to be patient and postpone your planting operations for just a little bit longer.

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13

Mar

2017

Agronomy Update

Time to Prep Your Planter

Author: Austin Scott

We are at the start of another challenging year with low commodity prices and shrinking margins. To succeed in a down market, we have to set ourselves up for success from the start. The best way to do that is to utilize all of your tools to their fullest potential. That means making sure your planter is ready for the field before it’s time to plant. Accuracy of plant spacing, seed depth, and seed-to-soil contact are the keys to achieving a picket fence stand and maximizing a crop’s yield potential. Below is a list of things to check before you pull out of the shop.
 

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