Beck's Blog

From Our Family Farm to Yours

1

Sep

2021

PFR Proven Success Strategies on Corn

Practical Farm Research

Author: Kate Roth

Each year brings new data from our Practical Farm Research (PFR®) team. By looking at diverse products and practices across several locations, we have determined five success strategies for corn that we believe will provide farmers with the highest likelihood of success.

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Categories: PFR

Tags: corn, PFR, proven farm research

1

Aug

2021

CropTalk: A Production Update with Jason Morehouse

August 2021

The Beck’s Mission Statement is: to provide our customers with the best in seed quality, field performance, and service. I find this mission statement to be evident within the production team, from the passion and dedication Jason spoke with about Beck’s production department during this interview.

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10

May

2021

CropTalk: A PFR Sneak Peek: Corn Silage

May 2021

Author: Ben Puestow

In many areas of the Midwest, silage is not an afterthought, it is the focus of the entire farm operation. With that in mind, Beck’s Practical Farm Research (PFR)® team will begin conducting corn silage-specific PFR studies in 2021. We know that there is a craving for agronomic research that focuses on producing hightonnage corn silage, and we are going to help find those answers.

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1

Apr

2021

CropTalk: Early-Season PFR Proven™

April 2021

Spring is here! Hopefully you’ve had a chance to look through the 2020 PFR Book and pick out a PFR Proven™ product or practice to try for 2021. With planting season here, we wanted to share a few early-season PFR Proven products and practices to consider implementing on your farm this spring.

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1

Mar

2021

CropTalk: Fresh, New Corn Products for 2021

March 2021

Author: Craig Moore

Each year we launch new and exciting corn products with added yield and additional agronomic strengths. The process to evaluate each class takes years and hundreds, if not thousands, of trials to assess the strengths and weaknesses of each product. It is rigorous; from field observations to data analysis, thousands of hybrids must be narrowed down to a select few that will be launched in our commercial lineup. These are the “best of the best” hybrids from the most elite breeding programs in the world.

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Categories: CropTalk, 2021

Tags: CropTalk, corn, 2021, new corn

1

Oct

2020

CropTalk: Corn Rootworm: 2020 Reflections for 2021 Solutions

October 2020

Author: Nate Firle

Corn rootworm tends to be a measurable issue every year, but 2020 corn rootworm incident reports have been higher than normal. Although farmers across Beck’s marketing area experienced higher rootworm populations, northern Iowa has the most documented reports. Iowa Field Agronomists NATE MAYER AND JON CASPERS have been in the trenches, evaluating corn rootworm damage, trait integrity, and measuring beetle populations to provide proactive recommendations for 2021 success.

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3

Aug

2020

CropTalk: Yield Components of Corn

August 2020

Corn grain yield, typically measured in bushels per acre, can be broken down into distinct components that each contribute to the weight of harvested grain. While genetics govern some yield components, much of the harvested yield is directly affected by environmental conditions and management practices. Yield components include number of plants per acre, number of ears per plant, the number of kernels per ear, and the weight of each kernel.

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2

Mar

2020

CropTalk: The Rotation: Corn Following Corn

March 2020

Author: Mike Blaine

For some, the prospect of growing corn following corn is challenging and promising. For others, in contrast to a corn following soybean (SB-C) rotation, the corn following corn (C-C) rotation imparts concern and consternation.

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2

Mar

2020

CropTalk: Beck's Fills The Bunks

March 2020

Author: Ben Puestow

Farmers understand that planting top-quality grain corn hybrids and soybean varieties is key to the overall success of an operation. The same can be said for forage crops. At Beck’s, we understand that if you’re growing corn silage and alfalfa, you are analyzing genetics and management practices just like you would for grain corn and soybeans. That is why we spend a lot of time evaluating both our silage hybrids and alfalfa varieties for their strongest attributes and how they can make your operation more profitable.

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4

Feb

2020

PFR Report: FLEXIBILITY IN YOUR NITROGEN PROGRAM

Cycles of precipitation, along with freezing and thawing in the Midwest, made fall field a challenge to say the least. For areas that primarily use anhydrous ammonia, this may be especially true with the increase in annual precipitation that we have experienced in the Corn Belt. Beck’s Practical Farm Research (PFR)® team has been conducting research on different nitrogen management products and practices to help farmers make decisions and analyze various options to maximize their ROI.

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5

Nov

2019

PFR Report: Delayed Planting

What were the top recommendations this year for delayed planting and how will it affect harvest? Check out this video to learn more.

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1

Oct

2019

CropTalk: Qrome Questions with Dr. Cavanaugh

October 2019

As you set forth your 2020 vision, there are new technologies at play in the seed industry. Trait names, trade names, and marketing campaigns can all obscure the message — making it difficult to discern the right traits for your farm. In an effort to help you understand one new technology in the corn market, Beck’s Director of Research, Dr. Kevin Cavanaugh, answered a few common questions.

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1

Sep

2019

CropTalk: A Harvest Plan WILL Make the Difference

September 2019

Author: Eric Wilson

This season has been one for the record books for nearly every state in the Corn Belt. Extreme rainfall and delayed planting forced many farmers to plant well into June and in some cases, July. As every seasoned farmer knows, conditions like what we saw in 2019 will have consequences. A carefully laid fall harvest plan will help to limit further losses come harvest time. If we look back one year to 2018, many of these same environmental conditions occurred across Southern Minnesota and Northern Iowa. There are lessons to learn and adapt to help us be more successful in 2019 across the Midwest.

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9

Jul

2019

PFR Report: Corn Fungicide Applications for 2019

With the challenging and stressful growing season that most of the Midwest’s corn crop has faced this year, many farmers have asked if a fungicide application is worth the investment for 2019.

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4

Jul

2019

CropTalk: Unplanted Acres: Utilizing the Silent Partners in Your Soil

July 2019

Spring of 2019 will be one that sets the standard for challenges. Farmers are resilient and went to great lengths to get the crop planted, but in low-lying, wet areas of many fields, there was no opportunity to plant row crops. So now, in addition to managing crops, many farmers must also manage their unplanted acres.

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5

Jun

2019

PFR Report: Planting - Under Film

Planting under film? We're up for the challenge!

Check out this PFR report as Samantha Miller, Agronomy Information Specialist, interviews Will Albrecht from F.O.R & SAMCO to learn more about their "Film on Roll" biodegradable mulch film product for row crops. 

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7

Nov

2018

PFR Report

Corn Planting Depth by Date

Author: Jim Schwartz

Planting depth for row crops is a main topic of discussion in the agricultural community. Beck’s PFR team has heard your questions and in response, has put planting depth to yet another test. You may have seen our planting depth data over the last few years, but this year we added a second planting date into the mix. For this study, we planted corn in April and in May. In April, we tend to see cooler, wetter soils whereas in May we sometimes experience drier periods with less rainfall and warmer soil temperatures. Soil temperature and moisture have a great effect on how plants emerge. In this study, we looked to evaluate how much soil conditions can affect plant emergence, and how much yield potential we lose with late-emerging plants.

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14

May

2018

PFR Report: How Sweet It Is

In-Furrow Sugar Applications

Author: Alex Knight

Can in-furrow applications of sugar increase nutrient availability and yields in corn?

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14

May

2018

PFR Report

Starting Strong with Starter Fertilizers

Author: Alex Knight

Review your fertility options for getting your corn crop going.

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6

Feb

2018

PFR Report

Let’s Recap…Emergence by Planting Date

Author: Alex Knight

Every year, Beck’s Practical Farm Research (PFR)® team evaluates, and then discusses, planting dates for corn. What is the ideal planting date for your region? Based on management practices including water management and tillage, can you get into the field during that timeframe?Better Late Than Never?
Every year, Beck’s Practical Farm Research (PFR)® team evaluates, and then discusses, planting dates for corn. What is the ideal planting date for your region? Based on management practices including water management and tillage, can you get into the field during that timeframe?
When we listen to winners from the NCGA yield contest, (https://thoughtsfromtheturnrow.com/2016/08/18/2014-ncga-yield-contest-winner/) one of the first things they tell us is we need consistency in emergence. One goal in PFR this year was to evaluate differences in emergence and determine how they impacted yield. 
Let’s Talk Regional Differences
Typically, we see the best planting window at our Ohio PFR site in mid- to late April, as our yield potential starts to decrease when we plant in early June.

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