Beck's Blog

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17

Sep

2020

Weed Management Brief: Power in the Pre

Author: Joe Bolte

Benjamin Franklin once said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” This quote can be applied to weed management today. Preventing weeds from emerging protects yield.

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10

Sep

2020

MULTIPLE SOAs: THE BEST WEED CONTROL OPTION

Author: Joe Bolte

The easiest weeds to control are those that never emerge. Cliché? Maybe. But as weeds continue to adapt, mounting resistance to herbicides builds every year. Sustainable control has become increasingly more challenging to achieve.

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17

Aug

2020

Weed Management Brief: POWER IN THE PRE™

Author: Joe Bolte

Benjamin Franklin once said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

This quote can be applied to weed management today. A successful pre-emerge application lays the foundation for a successful post-emerge application.

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15

Jun

2020

AGRONOMY TALK: Hail Damage

Author: Jon Caspers

With summer heat comes summer storms- and occasionally, hail damage. The impact (no pun intended) of hail on your crop depends on the severity of the initial damage, the growth stage of the crop, and weather conditions as the crop recovers.

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12

May

2020

AGRONOMY TALK: EARLY-SEASON SOYBEAN PESTS

This agronomy brief covers the damage caused by the most common early-season soybean pests, how to identify them, and how to manage them.

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12

May

2020

AGRONOMY TALK: EARLY-SEASON CORN PESTS

Author: Jon Skinner

This agronomy brief covers the damage caused by the most common early-season corn pests, how to identify them, and how to manage them.

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12

May

2020

AGRONOMY TALK: SOYBEAN YIELD COMPONENTS

Author: Jon Caspers

Soybean yields ultimately depend on the number and weight of the seeds harvested per acre. Soybean yield is determined by nodes per acre (plants per acre x nodes per plant), pods per node, seeds per pod, and seed weight.

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11

May

2020

AGRONOMY TALK: BLACK CUTWORM

Author: Scott Dickey

Black cutworm (BCW) (Agrotis ipsilon) is an insect pest in many areas of the world. It can cause significant economic damage to corn, soybean, cotton, and other crop species. In the Corn Belt, BCW larvae are primarily known for the damage they cause to newly emerged corn plants. Their feeding can result in cut off seedlings near ground level, thus, the name “cutworm”.

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21

Apr

2020

AGRONOMY TALK: FUSARIUM HEAD BLIGHT IN WHEAT

Author: Austin Scott

Fusarium Head Blight (FHB), also called head scab, is a disease that can affect many small grain crops, but its economic impact is the largest on wheat. The causal pathogen of this disease is Fusarium graminearum, and it can significantly impact yield and grain quality. The disease can produce many mycotoxins. Deoxynivalenol (DON), also known as vomitoxin, is the primary mycotoxin screened for at grain delivery points.

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20

Apr

2020

AGRONOMY TALK: STARTER FERTILIZER USE IN CORN

Starter fertilizers are relatively small amounts of plant nutrients, placed near the seed at planting. The two most common application methods are in-furrow, also called pop-up, and 2x2. While some planter setups are not a true 2 in. over and 2 in. below the seed, all banded starter fertilizer that’s not placed in the planting furrow is referred to as 2x2.

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20

Apr

2020

AGRONOMY TALK: COVER CROP TERMINATION

While cover crops provide a variety of benefits, cover crop termination in the spring requires additional management practices. Spring cover crop termination varies by cover crop species, the goals of cover cropping, whether that cover crop will be used in the spring (i.e., forage), weed pressure and species, and the proceeding cash crop.

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20

Apr

2020

AGRONOMY TALK: WESTERN BEAN CUTWORM

Author: Ben Puestow

Western bean cutworm (WBC) is a relatively new pest to field corn in the Midwest. While WBC is native to North America, it has primarily been a pest of specialty crops up until the early 2000s. Like European corn borer and earworms, WBC is part of the Lepidoptera family of corn pests, meaning they resemble caterpillars. Even though they look much like corn borers and earworms, their feeding and life cycle is quite different.

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20

Apr

2020

Agronomy Talk: SOYBEAN APHIDS

Soybean aphids (Aphis glycines Matsumara) are a piercing and sucking insect that have been affecting soybeans in the U.S. since the early 2000s. Aphids tend to be a problem in late-planted soybean fields during years with dry conditions and moderate temperatures. The insects themselves are small (1/16 in. long), pear-shaped, and yellow-to-green in color. They have black extensions on the body toward the back legs that are often called “tailpipes.” Winds deposit aphids in fields, so the infestation works from the top of the plant to the bottom. Aphids are most damaging in dry field conditions but shy away from heat, so look for them on the underside of leaves.

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10

Apr

2020

AGRONOMY TALK: SOYBEAN CYST NEMATODE (SCN)

Author: Pat Holloway

Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) in the United States was first observed in 1954 in North Carolina, and it has continued to spread throughout most of the major soybean growing areas (Tylka and Marett 2014). It is the most damaging pest in soybeans by a large margin. 

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10

Apr

2020

AGRONOMY TALK: MANAGING THREATS TO EARLY PLANTED SOYBEANS

Author: Jim Schwartz

Twenty years of Beck’s Practical Farm Research (PFR)® data indicates that one key to optimizing soybean yield over time is early planting. Early planting of soybeans increases the number of nodes, which creates additional pods and higher yield.

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1

Apr

2020

Agronomy Talk: MANAGING PREVENT PLANT ACRES

Author: Mike Blaine

Top priorities for prevent plant (PP) acres in the spring include; tiling, tillage, residue, cover crops, weeds, nutrients, soil health, and insects.

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1

Apr

2020

Agronomy Talk: Frogeye Leaf Spot

Frogeye leaf spot (FLS), caused by the pathogen Cercospora sojina, is a common soybean foliar disease of many soybean-producing regions worldwide. In the U.S., the disease is established in southern production regions and has recently become prevalent in the Midwest and Upper Midwest. It’s believed that the range expansion and increased disease severity are caused by widespread planting of susceptible varieties, warmer winter temperatures, and the increased adoption of conservation tillage practices, which, together, lead to increased inoculum levels. FLS does not always cause yield loss, but yield loss of up to 60% has been reported with severe infection rates.

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10

Mar

2020

agronomy talk: SOYBEAN PLANTING DATE AND POPULATION

Author: Jim Schwartz

As farming becomes more complex and time becomes more precious, farmers are searching for ways to increase revenue and manage input costs on every acre. This leads us to ask, what soybean management practices can save you time, make the most sense agronomically, and make you money?

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10

Mar

2020

agronomy talk: SOYBEAN FUNGICIDE & FOLIAR Mn APPLICATION

Author: Jim Schwartz

Manganese (Mn) is important in a soybean plant for its role in the activation of enzymes and in the process of photosynthesis. Additionally, Mn is known to regulate potassium (K) uptake.

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10

Mar

2020

AGRONOMY TALK: SOYBEAN FOLIAR NUTRITION

Author: Jim Schwartz

We know that different nutrients are required at different times for optimum soybean yields. Current soybean biomass production shows a two-fold increase from the 1930s, and yields show a three-fold increase. With these drastic changes in genetics, it only makes sense that we would also see changes in nutrient uptake. In addition to genetics, there is evidence that environmental factors like temperature, moisture, and soil fertility influence nutrient uptake.

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