Agronomy Talk

15

Jun

2015

Agronomy Update

Field Conditions and Insect Report

Author: Denny Cobb

The extensive rain we have experienced throughout central Indiana has had significant impact on our crops. Below you will find sales intern Christy Kettler's scouting report for the week of June 8 which touches on what we are seeing in our fields as a result of the wet conditions, as well as the trap findings and what you can expect in the coming weeks.

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10

Jun

2015

Agronomy Update

Nitrogen Studies and Rapid Growth Syndrome

Author: Alex Johnson

In this week’s Agronomy Update, Beck’s sales intern Rachel Garen and I take you through some of the exciting nitrogen research studies we are conducting here at the London, OH Practical Farm Research (PFR)® site. I have also been experiencing numerous calls and made a number of field visits across the state of Ohio, which have rendered comparisons of yellow corn plants for many different reasons. One major cause of yellowing corn plants is rapid growth syndrome, which is a result of both weather and hybrid variety.

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8

Jun

2015

Agronomy Update

Micronutrient Uptake Struggles for Indiana Corn and Rapid Growth Syndrome

Author: Denny Cobb

This summer Christy Kettler, a junior at Purdue University majoring in Agronomy, will be interning here at Beck’s. Working with myself and our area sales team, Christy will be completing intensive crop scouting on 8,500 acres in central Indiana. In addition to scouting diseases, she will also be using pheromone traps to monitor insect moth activity within this area during the entire summer. With this information we hope to provide you with details of how many insects are in the area, when we can expect these moths to lay eggs, and the insect larvae to hatch.  

As Christy continues to monitor moth captures, diseases and insects throughout the summer, we will send out detailed reports to keep you aware of these findings on both corn and soybeans. If you have any questions about these findings or would like more information, please reach out to myself or your seed advisor for more information.

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4

Jun

2015

Agronomy Update

Seeding Rate, PFR Video Update, and Nitrogen Rates for Ohio

Author: Alex Johnson

Across the state of Ohio, many farmers have been done planting for at least a week or two. Unfortunately, there are others that haven't been so lucky.  Rain has been a challenge, leaving some acres of soybeans left to plant across the state. The question then becomes, how do we adjust our seeding rate when planting soybeans this late?

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20

May

2015

S. Indiana - Steve Gauck, CCA

Scout & Evaluate Planting

Author: Steve Gauck

Wheat can become the forgotten crop this time of year. We had a tough winter, but overall wheat looks good. As you scout your wheat, keep an eye out for leaf diseases and any weeds that may have escaped. If you only scout wheat once, make sure to pay close attention at flowering. If we have wet weather, make sure to apply a fungicide for head scab! 

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20

May

2015

S. Illinois & Missouri - Jonathan Perkins, CCA

Spring Scouting Importance

The month of May is a busy time of year for most of us, to say the least. This does not allow much time for scouting, but it is important this time of year. To review some key points, let’s think about the crops in the field in May. 

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20

May

2015

N. Indiana & Michigan - Denny Cobb, CPAG

Know Your Soil for Multiple Nitrogen Applications

Author: Denny Cobb

Nitrogen (N) management is a key yield component. I like to see multiple N “meals” served to corn prior to tasseling. The main reason for this is how much N your soils can hold at any one time. A general rule of thumb is 10 lbs. N for every CEC unit. As an example, a sandy loam soil with a CEC of 6 theoretically can only “hold” 60 lbs. N at any one application. Conversely, a silty clay loam soil with a CEC of 18 can “hold” 180 lbs. N at any one application. 

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20

May

2015

NW Illinois & Iowa - Craig Kilby, CCA

Assess Crop Input Decisions

Author: Craig Kilby

As the calendar rolls into May, it becomes an ideal time to assess the performance of several crop input decisions. Decisions such as planting depth, population, seedbed preparation, stand establishment, fertilizer applications, nutrition plans, and insect management are all fresh in your mind. Make small observations today and record them to help further interpret harvest yield and field performance later this season. Make a checklist of the following items as you investigate your fields: 

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20

May

2015

NE Illinois & NW Indiana - Chad Kalaher, CCA

Scout Early for Best Management Options

Author: Chad Kalaher

Depending on corn and soybean planting dates and growing conditions, late May is usually an optimum time to scout fields for earlyseason crop protection and management needs. Evaluate the weed control performance of pre-plant/pre-emerge herbicides and the potential need for a post-emerge application. 

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20

May

2015

E. Indiana & W. Ohio - Brent Minett, CCA

Minimizing Nitrogen Loss

Author: Brent Minett

Nothing stirs debate more than a nitrogen (N) rate discussion at the coffee shop or ball game. Is it just because it is an expensive input or could it be because the correct answer for N rate varies so much from year to year? Universities, Beck’s and other companies and organizations have spent a lot of time and resources trying to pinpoint the exact rate of N needed to maximize yields and profits at the same time. 


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14

May

2015

Agronomy Update

S. Indiana: Fungicides in Wheat

Author: Steve Gauck

Despite its deceivingly short height, wheat has reproductively matured well over the last few weeks. I have not seen any leaf diseases to be concerned about, but if you are thinking about fungicides, make sure to first determine if you are concerned about leaf diseases or head scab (Fusarium Head Blight.)

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13

May

2015

Agronomy Update

Missouri Field Observations From Early Season Scouting

Author: David Hughes

Planting is well underway in Missouri. It is always exciting to be part of the prospect for an abundant harvest this fall. I’d like to share the following field observations from my early season field scouting.

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7

May

2015

Agronomy Update

Emergence and Growth Stage Updates for Corn, Soybeans and Wheat

Author: Chad Kalaher

Other than cool soil temperatures during much of April, most farmers experienced near ideal soil conditions (moisture and texture) for planting corn. For April-planted corn, 10-15 days to emergence has been a common range. As of May 6, all the corn I have looked at that was planted on or before April 24, has emerged. If you have corn that was planted in April, that has been in the ground for more than 14 days and has not yet emerged, a field visit may be necessary to determine the cause and evaluate the potential need for replant.

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6

May

2015

Agronomy Update

Ohio Updates From the Field: Weeds and Corn Emergence

Author: Alex Johnson

Two things I wanted to share with you this week are a list of weeds I am seeing in the field, and a way to figure how soon your crop will come up.

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29

Apr

2015

Agronomy Update

Time Period For Corn Emergence

Author: Chad Kalaher

Some areas throughout my geography began planting corn as early as April 1 - 6. Other notable planting windows have been April 10 - 17 and April 21 - 24. Soil texture and moisture have been desirable for field work in these areas, however, cold soil temperatures and rainfall forecasts have been a concern recently. 

I have been asked several questions about the number of days required for corn emergence...

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28

Apr

2015

Agronomy Update

Soil Conditions: How Wet is Too Wet?

Author: Alex Johnson

As your agronomist in Ohio, I dig a lot of roots. Sometimes, the roots I dig do not go very deep and are concentrated in the upper 3 in. of soil. Root problems during the growing season can start in the spring. When the weather is wet in the spring the temptation rises to push things. But let’s talk about how wet is too wet.

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27

Apr

2015

Agronomy Update

Corn and Soybean Plantability Tips

Author: Denny Cobb

Smaller sized seed corn will be the norm for 2015. As you know, this is a result of an excellent growing season which had very few stressors during the pollination and grain fill periods. Overall, smaller size seed corn poses fewer planting challenges than heavier, larger sized seed. Here are a few pointers for planting small size corn seed.

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24

Apr

2015

Agronomy Update

Effects of Freezing Temperatures on Wheat

Author: Chad Kalaher

With the cold temperatures we experienced last week, I wanted to share some key points on the effects of freezing temperatures on wheat. Some of this information is courtesy of our regional product specialist in Ohio, Mark Apelt.

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24

Apr

2015

Agronomy Update

The Potential Effects of Hard Frost on Wheat

Author: Mark Apelt

Many areas of Ohio received record low temperatures on the morning of April 24. Temperatures dropped into the mid-20s in several areas of northern Ohio, while shattering previous lows by 5-7ºF in parts of central and southern Ohio (London for example). Many farmers may be wondering what (if any) effect will this have on their wheat crop. The extent of damage you may see will vary based on a few factors such as: the stage of growth of your wheat crop, the variety planted, maturity, planting date, planting depth, and temperature.

Let’s discuss each of these in a little more detail.

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22

Apr

2015

Agronomy Update

Ohio Wheat Evaluation Part 2 - Some Green, Some Not. Why?

Author: Alex Johnson

Last week I met our regional product specialist, Mark Apelt, at L & S wheat plot in Pandora, OH to revisit our initial wheat evaluation from earlier this spring. The wheat is now greened up, however, some fields that looked great when we first scouted them in late March now have parts of the field that are now dead. The question is, “why?”

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