Agronomy Talk

14

Nov

2018

Agronomy Talk: Storing Damaged Grain

When a farmer ends up with damaged grain at harvest, the best thing to do is sell it as quickly as possible. However, sometimes due to the obligation to fulfill contracts or the ability to utilize bin space to capture carry in the market, it becomes necessary to store damaged grain.

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17

Oct

2018

Agronomy Talk: Seed Quality in Soybeans

High rainfall and warm temperatures after maturity physically cause the soybean pod to swell and shrink. Any structural weakness in the pod from diseases or insect feeding will allow moisture into the pod where it affects the soybean itself. The pods then split open from the physical stress of swelling with moisture. Soybeans exposed to warm temperature and high moisture are also subject to germinating in the pod. All soybean varieties are susceptible to damage in exceptionally wet years. 

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12

Oct

2018

AGRONOMY TALK: EAR MOLD IDENTIFICATION

Author: Steve Gauck

We are having a particularly wet harvest in many areas. Keep an eye out for deteriorating grain quality. Here’s a good reference guide from Steve Gauck on ear molds in corn.

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12

Oct

2018

Agronomy Update: Checking Stalk Quality

Author: Nate Mayer

In this agronomy update, Nate Mayer and Jerry Mathis, Field Agronomist for Beck's Hybrids, evaluate late-season stalk integrity as we prepare for harvest.

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13

Jul

2018

Agronomy Update: Checking Corn Pollination

Author: Steve Gauck

It's pollination time in Southern Indiana and this agronomy update is all about checking how well your corn is pollinating.

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14

Apr

2016

S. Illinois - Sean Nettleton, CCA

Hitting a Home Run in 2016

Every year when April rolls around, I get excited about two things: baseball season and getting those planters rolling! Hi, I’m your new southern Illinois field agronomist, Sean Nettleton. For my first ever Agronomy Talk, I wanted to keep it simple and talk about what I think is the most important pass we make in the field - planting! 

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14

Apr

2016

Kentucky & Tennessee - Austin Scott, CCA

Spring Reminders for Planting

Author: Austin Scott

Finally, that time of year has arrived... planting season! With many farmers preparing to plant and others already rolling through the field, there are a few things to keep in mind this spring. The first is to get your planter set. It’s always wise to inspect your planter and service it before you have half your crop planted. 

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14

Apr

2016

W. Iowa - Pat Holloway, CCA

What's the Best Soybean Planting Date?

Author: Pat Holloway

Does tax deadline time mean it’s time to plant soybeans? Trends over the past couple of decades have shown that farmers continue to plant corn earlier as farm sizes increase and we continue to push for higher yields. On the other hand, farmers often wait to plant soybeans until later in the year. Beck’s 10-year Practical Farm Research (PFR)® data demonstrates that the highest average soybean yields were obtained when planting occurred between April 15 and May 15.

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14

Apr

2016

NW Illinois - Craig Kilby, CCA

Planting Fundamentals

Author: Craig Kilby

April is here and our minds become overwhelmed with everything happening on the farm. Let’s put all the excitement (or possibly anxiety) aside for a minute and focus on planting fundamentals as this will set the yield potential for the year. If you’re not certain that everything on your planter is ready, check out Jason Webster’s planter prep video on YouTube. It can be found here. Make sure to have a planting prescription prepared and follow it. 

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14

Apr

2016

Missouri - David Hughes, CCA

Planning Hybrid Placement

Author: David Hughes

Corn planting is underway for many farmers and we are implementing the field plans we have made since harvest. A critical component of our planning is hybrid placement. Putting the right product in the right field or sub-field area is important to maximizing performance. Efforts made by you, your dealer, seed advisor, and agronomist to position hybrids accurately for maximum yield only come to fruition if followed when the planter hits the field. 

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14

Apr

2016

E. Indiana & W. Ohio - Brent Minett, CCA

How Early Should I Plant Corn?

Author: Brent Minett

How early should I plant corn? We ask ourselves that question every spring because unfortunately, the correct answer is illusive. It really depends on many variables that we have very little ability to control. Below are a few factors to consider when trying to answer this question for your own farm.

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14

Apr

2016

NW Indiana, NE Illinois & SE Wisconsin - Chad Kalaher, CCA

Profitability on Every Acre

Author: Chad Kalaher

As the 2016 season gets underway, profitability on every single acre appears to be challenging. The best advice I would give farmers is to keep a positive attitude, focus on fundamental agronomic principles, and seek information from trusted advisors. In addition, use resources including your own on-farm experiences and Beck’s Practical Farm Research (PFR)® data to help maximize profitability and yield. 

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14

Apr

2016

Ohio - Alex Johnson, CCA

Make it Count!

Author: Alex Johnson

Springtime is my favorite time of year! After five months of cold, frozen and wet, I love getting out into the field to start the 2016 growing season. My slogan for this growing season is “MAKE IT COUNT.” Why is that important? It is easy to get in a hurry, especially this time of year. I’m guilty of it as well. But one thing that can put spring business into perspective is: “MAKE IT COUNT.” Each year we get one shot. Let’s strive to make it our best shot each year.

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14

Apr

2016

S. Indiana - Steve Gauck, CCA

Planting Reminders

Author: Steve Gauck

A new growing season is upon us! As you head to the fields with your planters this year make sure to double check everything. Take time that first day to look over the planter. Check depth, plant spacing, fertilizer rates, closing wheels, talc, and graphite. Mistakes made with the planter will haunt you all season. 

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14

Apr

2016

C. Iowa - Wade Kent, CCA

Combating Emergence Issues

Author: Wade Kent

The start of the 2016 planting season is here and it’s time to begin watching our crop develop. Delayed emergence of both corn and soybeans is a common issue that occurs across the Corn Belt. Emergence issues are normally tied to either cool and wet or very dry soils.

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20

Oct

2015

S. Illinois - Jonathan Perkins, CCA

Evaluations During Harvest

When the combine hits the field, I always feel a sense of accomplishment. On the research farm, harvest is one of the most exciting times of the season. We get to see the results of our hard work come to fruition. During harvest, we remain observant to provide you with agronomic explanations. This season, we will likely see every ditch or change in slope of ground that may have been wet longer. We will take note of this and evaluate how it affects our plots to bring you the most accurate information to help you make better management decisions on your farms! I encourage each of you to do the same on your own fields as you go through harvest.

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20

Oct

2015

NW Illinois & Iowa - Craig Kilby, CCA

Fall Fertility Decisions

Author: Craig Kilby

Fall fertility decisions in northwest Illinois have traditionally been based on crop removal and recent soil test levels. That may remain unchanged for some in 2015, while others may find the need to adjust levels lower due to economics. The cost to apply major nutrients like P and K have not dropped at the same rate as grain prices, resulting in heightened interest of economical use of these nutrients. Referring to soil test information, P and K can be allocated to only those areas most likely to respond to applications. Be sure to review critical levels of nutrients for corn, soybean, wheat, and alfalfa. The probability and magnitude of return to P and K fertilizer will increase when applied to soil test levels below the critical level.

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20

Oct

2015

NW Indiana, NE Illinois, SE Wisconsin - Chad Kalaher, CCA

Review Product Performance and Management Practices

Author: Chad Kalaher

After harvest 2015 is complete, it’s important to conduct a review of product performance and management practices for the year. Lessons can be learned each year regarding what worked and what didn’t. Although each year can be uniquely different, noticing trends that lead to higher yields and greater returns on investment will continue to be important.

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20

Oct

2015

E. Indiana & W. Ohio - Brent Minett, CCA

Stalk Quality and Harvest Prioritization

Author: Brent Minett

Stalk quality can be negatively affected by three factors: disease, nutrient deficiency, and environment. Fungal diseases like fusarium, anthracnose, and gibberella stalk rot cause decay of the internal pith tissues of the stalk. Nitrogen deficiency can lead to the ear cannibalizing the stalk to feed itself. Extended straight line winds in excess of 60 mph can cause any hybrid to lodge; especially those fields that have experienced stress from the other two factors. Harvest prioritization will be especially important this fall.

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20

Oct

2015

S. Indiana - Steve Gauck, CCA

Evaluate Fungicide Applications During Harvest

Author: Steve Gauck

This year can be called the year of leaf diseases! We have seen gray leaf spot, northern corn leaf blight, and even southern rust. Corn has filled out well, but stalk quality is a concern as plants have cannibalized with the late dry stress. Harvest will be a chance for us to evaluate our fungicide applications. Many diseases came in late and the residual from the fungicide may be gone. In some cases, these diseases may not have affected yield dramatically. If you are planning to go corn after corn, consider what diseases you had and plant a hybrid with good tolerance to them.

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