Agronomy Talk

31

Oct

2018

Agronomy Talk: Stalk Rot in Corn

Author: Eric Wilson

There are numerous stalk rots that affect corn in mid to late season. Weather, nutrition and genetic disease tolerance all play major parts in the disease cycle. Plants move nutrients from the stalks to the ears during grain fill. High yields mean heavier ears. These two phenomena combined can make stalk quality issues a problem even in very high-yielding areas.

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23

Oct

2018

Agronomy Talk: Tar Spot in Corn

Tar Spot is a new phenomenon in the US. It is caused by a fungus called Phyllachora maydis, native to Central America. Tar Spot had only been identified in very isolated geographies in the U.S. until the summer of 2018. In Central America, the yield-robbing form of Tar Spot forms a complex with two other plant pathogens, neither of which have been documented in the U.S. It is unknown whether the Tar Spot organism is forming a pathogenic complex with other species present in the Midwest. 

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20

Aug

2015

NW Indiana, NE Illinois, SE Wisconsin - Chad Kalaher, CCA

Concerns for Corn and Soybeans Heading Into Harvest

Author: Chad Kalaher

Record precipitation totals for June have caused concern for corn and soybeans heading into harvest. Many corn fields lost nitrogen and will have a limited ability to adequately fill kernels. Because of this, I expect many corn fields will have ears displaying aborted kernels. In addition, saturated soils may have pre-disposed corn plants to stalk rot infection.

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20

Jul

2015

N. Indiana & Michigan - Denny Cobb, CPAG

Continue Scouting to Keep Disease and Pests in Check

Author: Denny Cobb

Soybean cyst nematode sampling is best done six to eight weeks after planting. Target fields where yields have plateaued, areas with pH>7, and areas where weed control is lacking.

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20

Jul

2015

NW Indiana & NE Illinois - Chad Kalaher, CCA

Challenging Spring Makes Disease Prevention Crutial

Author: Chad Kalaher

Spring was challenging for many farmers due to inconsistent weather patterns, fluctuating temperatures and heavy precipitation. In most cases, stand reductions in corn and soybeans were a result of this. Some corn experienced an imbibitional chilling effect and/or corkscrewed mesocotyls. Replant was necessary where very heavy rainfall occurred shortly after planting and prior to crop emergence. Most of the agronomic challenges experienced were related to cool and/or wet conditions. In some areas, stand challenges were magnified by timing of a herbicide application and specific herbicide chemistry, especially in soybeans. In corn, interveinal leaf striping and rapid growth syndrome were both found near V3-V6. Again, both of these can be related to environmental conditions and typically improve with favorable conditions.

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20

May

2015

S. Illinois & Missouri - Jonathan Perkins, CCA

Spring Scouting Importance

The month of May is a busy time of year for most of us, to say the least. This does not allow much time for scouting, but it is important this time of year. To review some key points, let’s think about the crops in the field in May. 

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