Agronomy Talk

16

Apr

2019

Agronomy Talk: SPRING APPLIED ANHYDROUS AMMONIA RISKS

Author: Jim Schwartz

Often, farmers find themselves pressed for time in the spring and are forced into tight windows of operation. One operation that many farmers need to carefully consider is the spring application of anhydrous ammonia. Although it’s possible to apply anhydrous before planting, there are strategies to reduce the risk of injury. Keep in mind that there are many ways to apply nitrogen to a crop in-season, so planting should always take precedence to nitrogen applications. Even if you have pre-paid for your anhydrous, you can still sidedress anhydrous with great success.

Comments (0) Number of views (488)

17

Oct

2016

Agronomy Update

Planning Now for a Successful 2017

Author: Luke Schulte

After a slow start to the 2016 harvest, farmers throughout Ohio are now in full swing. Harvest marks the final stage to our 2016 crop, it is also the first step in preparing for your 2017 crop. Sitting in the combine at harvest is the perfect time to evaluate the various inputs and practices we implemented throughout the past growing season. 

Comments (0) Number of views (6063)

20

Oct

2015

Missouri - David Hughes, CCA

Time to Grow Winter Wheat in Missouri

Author: David Hughes

Throughout the month of August I had the privilege to work alongside Beck’s Practical Farm Research (PFR)® staff, conducting agronomy research tours at Beck’s Field Shows at both our Henderson, KY and Effingham, IL locations as well as Becknology™ Days in Atlanta, IN. Beck’s PFR program embodies the essence of Beck’s values (teamwork, integrity, innovation, adaptability, commitment, and passion) like no other agronomy program with which I have been associated. From the beginning, Beck’s founders have demonstrated a passion for observing and measuring the components of successful crop production from which they adapt and innovate to improve production systems. The PFR program is the natural evolution of this process, and its research data is now something we as Missouri farmers can access and deploy in our corn, soybean, and wheat production systems.

Comments (0) Number of views (4591)

20

Sep

2015

Missouri - David Hughes, CCA

Soil Testing Game Plan

Author: David Hughes

As combines roll during harvest, be ready with a soil testing game-plan. Optimum crop nutrition requires an accurate inventory of the critical nutrients in your soil. Prioritize fields to include: newly acquired fields; fields that have not been soil tested within the past three years, and fields with observed nutrient deficiencies.

Comments (0) Number of views (4573)

20

Aug

2015

S. Indiana - Steve Gauck, CCA

Evaluating Corn and Soybean Crops

Author: Steve Gauck

What a year it has been. As we evaluate our crop in August, we have a great opportunity to take a hard look at yield potential and yield loss suffered this year. As you walk corn fields, pull ears and check for pollination problems. If you see some, think back to pollination time. Was it dry, wet, hot or cold? We lost a lot of nitrogen early. Are ears stunted?

Comments (0) Number of views (4932)

20

Jul

2015

Missouri - David Hughes, CCA

Nitrogen and Fungicide Decisions

Author: David Hughes

In July, nitrogen (N) loss will be apparent in Missouri corn fields due to excessive rainfall from time of application to time of maximum plant uptake. Corn can respond favorably to rescue N all the way to tassel if required (see “Rescue N” article this issue). Don’t leave money on the table if N has become yield limiting. This is also a critical time to make corn fungicide application decisions. Scout fields regularly for signs of corn foliar diseases. Early symptoms don’t always mean a disease will spread and become yield limiting.

Comments (0) Number of views (5263)

24

Mar

2015

Agronomy Update

E. Indiana and Ohio: Nitrogen Stabilizers Simplified

Author: Alex Johnson

Whether you’re applying nitrogen (N) on your corn or wheat crop, knowing which nitrogen stabilizer to consider can be confusing! There are many out there. They protect from different types of loss, and they are specific to fertilizer form. Let’s simplify it!

Comments (0) Number of views (8665)
RSS

Connect with us

        


Follow us on Pinterest Follow us on Pinterest