Agronomy Talk

3

May

2019

Agronomy Talk: PFR Proven Fungicides in Wheat

Author: Jim Schwartz

It’s that time of year again. It's the time of year for our wheat to start flowering, so fungicide applications should be top of mind. With the kind of spring we are experiencing throughout much of the Midwest, many factors favor Fusarium head blight (head scab) onset.

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17

Apr

2019

Agronomy Update: Southern Illinois Wheat

Earlier this week I scouted some fields in Southern Illinois following the rains we received last weekend. 

With this wheat in this field pushing Feekes 7, I plan on taking some soil and tissue samples in a few different spots to see what's going on in these plants. 

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9

Apr

2019

Agronomy Talk: SPRING FREEZE DAMAGE TO WINTER WHEAT

Author: Steve Gauck

Cold weather prevents wheat plants from breaking dormancy, so in cold springs, wheat crops may be slow to greenup. Delayed greenup is less concerning than cold damage to the wheat crop.

Chilling injury is only one part of the evaluation of winter wheat in the spring. If the fall was wet and challenging, there could be stand establishment concerns. In some low areas, the seed may have rotted in the fall. If the plant has fewer than three developed leaves going into the winter, it is more prone to injury as the crown is underdeveloped.

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7

Feb

2018

Agronomy Update

How Does Your Wheat Look

Author: Austin Scott

Did this year's freezing temperatures affect your yield potential?

While total wheat acres are down this year due to commodity prices, there there are still several thousand acres of Beck’s wheat planted throughout the South.

Unfortunately, that wheat has had a very troubled start this season. During planting, we experienced several weeks of dry weather that slowed emergence and even delayed planting. Then, in early January, we experienced two weather events that brought below normal temperatures (single digits in some areas) for extended periods of time. I have had several concerned farmers call and ask me if these weather events damaged their wheat crop and, true to my agronomist nature, my answer has been, “it depends on several factors.”

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28

Apr

2017

Agronomy Update

Preventing Fusarium Head Scab in Your Wheat

Author: Steve Gauck

Scouting your wheat now is critical to preventing Fusarium head scab in your fields. Get to know and understand the wheat growth stages and timing and be prepared to apply fungicide when necessary.

 

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12

Apr

2017

Agronomy Update

Wheat Head Scab Updates

Author: Austin Scott

Much of the wheat throughout my territory is now between Feekes 10 (head in boot) and Feekes 10.1 (grain head visible). This means that within the next two weeks, it will be time to start making fungicide applications to protect our wheat against Fusarium head blight (head scab).

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23

Mar

2017

Agronomy Update

WHEAT FOLLOW-UP WITH Sean Nettleton: ASSESSING FREEZE DAMAGE

Beck’s agronomist, Sean Nettleton, provides an update to last week’s wheat webinar on freeze damage.

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23

Mar

2017

Agronomy Update

Wheat Follow-up with Austin Scott: Assessing Freeze Damage

Author: Austin Scott

Beck’s agronomist, Austin Scott, provides an update to last week’s wheat webinar on freeze damage.

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23

Mar

2017

Agronomy Update

Wheat Follow-up with Chad Kalaher: Assessing Freeze Damage

Author: Chad Kalaher

Beck’s agronomist, Chad Kalaher, provides an update to last week’s wheat webinar on freeze damage.

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22

Feb

2017

Agronomy Update

Your Wheat and the Warmer Weather

Earlier this month I sent an update discussing how the warmer weather could affect nitrogen (N) applications on wheat. With another stretch of unseasonably warm weather upon us, I thought it would be a great time to provide a quick update on our wheat crop.

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8

Feb

2017

Agronomy Update

2017 Wheat Outlook

Author: Steve Gauck

We have been experiencing warmer than usual temperatures this winter in Southern Indiana. In terms of wheat, this warm weather has not concerned me as it is what happens in early spring that affects yield the most. The two factors that have the biggest impact on our quest to achieving high-yielding wheat are scouting and nitrogen (N) management. As you begin to evaluate your wheat stand, one of the most important things to remember is to perform stand checks. This can be done with a 1 x 1 ft. square, as shown below. Be sure to take counts at multiple locations that represent different landscape positions in your fields.

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3

Feb

2017

Agronomy Update

2017 Wheat Updates

Author: David Hughes

I’ve recently had the opportunity to scout a few wheat fields and I wanted to share with you a few updates. 

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3

Feb

2017

Agronomy Update

Wheat Updates and Nitrogen Managment

I’ve received a few calls over the past few weeks from wheat farmers inquiring whether or not their wheat fields were starting to break dormancy. From what I’ve seen, the answer is yes. Many wheat fields have in fact “greened up” over the last couple of weeks. With temperatures reaching the mid-60s on January 21 and 22, and nighttime temperatures remaining above freezing until around January 26, a definite change has taken place across southern Illinois wheat fields.

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17

May

2016

Agronomy Update

Ohio Fields Showing Signs of Frost Damage

Author: Alex Johnson

The cool temperatures we have experienced over the last several nights have led to questions regarding frost damage. We are seeing some signs of frost damage here at our Ohio Practical Farm Research (PFR)® location, however we won’t know the severity of this damage until three to five days following the frost event. With the low temperatures leading up to this recent frost event, the hardening off process had started making our crops more tolerant of cool temperatures. Wet soils and dew present helps to maintain soil temperatures, thereby decreasing the risk of injury.

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28

Apr

2016

Agronomy Update

Considerations for Wheat Fungicide Applications

Author: Chad Kalaher

Most of the wheat in our area was planted between October 1-10, with the majority planted by October 7. Along with timely planting, the warm fall promoted excellent fall growth and tillering for overwintering. I noticed a few challenges this spring where seeding depth was too shallow or significant residue created poor seed-to-soil contact. I continue to see that the best stands are the ones where residue has been evenly-distributed and lightly incorporated with a vertical tillage tool or disk prior to seeding. No-till also continues to work well where the seed is placed deep enough for good seed-to-soil contact.


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20

Oct

2015

NW Illinois & Iowa - Craig Kilby, CCA

Fall Fertility Decisions

Author: Craig Kilby

Fall fertility decisions in northwest Illinois have traditionally been based on crop removal and recent soil test levels. That may remain unchanged for some in 2015, while others may find the need to adjust levels lower due to economics. The cost to apply major nutrients like P and K have not dropped at the same rate as grain prices, resulting in heightened interest of economical use of these nutrients. Referring to soil test information, P and K can be allocated to only those areas most likely to respond to applications. Be sure to review critical levels of nutrients for corn, soybean, wheat, and alfalfa. The probability and magnitude of return to P and K fertilizer will increase when applied to soil test levels below the critical level.

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20

May

2015

S. Indiana - Steve Gauck, CCA

Scout & Evaluate Planting

Author: Steve Gauck

Wheat can become the forgotten crop this time of year. We had a tough winter, but overall wheat looks good. As you scout your wheat, keep an eye out for leaf diseases and any weeds that may have escaped. If you only scout wheat once, make sure to pay close attention at flowering. If we have wet weather, make sure to apply a fungicide for head scab! 

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20

May

2015

N. Indiana & Michigan - Denny Cobb, CPAG

Know Your Soil for Multiple Nitrogen Applications

Author: Denny Cobb

Nitrogen (N) management is a key yield component. I like to see multiple N “meals” served to corn prior to tasseling. The main reason for this is how much N your soils can hold at any one time. A general rule of thumb is 10 lbs. N for every CEC unit. As an example, a sandy loam soil with a CEC of 6 theoretically can only “hold” 60 lbs. N at any one application. Conversely, a silty clay loam soil with a CEC of 18 can “hold” 180 lbs. N at any one application. 

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6

Feb

2015

Agronomy Update

Applying Nitrogen to Wheat Can Be A Tough Decision This Time Of Year

Author: Steve Gauck

Applying Nitrogen (N) to wheat can be a tough decision this time of year. Many of us have no intention of scouting fields in this weather, but a quick look at your wheat fields can help make some decisions on N rate and timing.


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