Agronomy Talk

1

Nov

2018

Agronomy Update: Crown Rot and Late-Season Corn Standability

Author: Steve Gauck

We have received a lot of phone calls about down corn throughout the season. 

Early on, this issue was primarily caused by saturated soils and heavy winds that pushed the corn over at the root system.

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31

Oct

2018

Agronomy Talk: Stalk Rot in Corn

Author: Eric Wilson

There are numerous stalk rots that affect corn in mid to late season. Weather, nutrition and genetic disease tolerance all play major parts in the disease cycle. Plants move nutrients from the stalks to the ears during grain fill. High yields mean heavier ears. These two phenomena combined can make stalk quality issues a problem even in very high-yielding areas.

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23

Oct

2018

Agronomy Talk: Tar Spot in Corn

Tar Spot is a new phenomenon in the US. It is caused by a fungus called Phyllachora maydis, native to Central America. Tar Spot had only been identified in very isolated geographies in the U.S. until the summer of 2018. In Central America, the yield-robbing form of Tar Spot forms a complex with two other plant pathogens, neither of which have been documented in the U.S. It is unknown whether the Tar Spot organism is forming a pathogenic complex with other species present in the Midwest. 

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25

Jun

2018

Agronomy Update: Tissue Testing in Corn and Soybeans

Author: Eric Wilson

Do you know how, when, and where should you tissue test? Do you know how to handle your samples once you pull them? What should you be thinking about when evaluating the results? 
 

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21

May

2018

Agronomy Update: Effects of Suboptimal Planting Conditions

Author: Chad Kalaher

Recent scouting has show that the suboptimal planting conditions experienced in McLean County, Illinois are having some impact on the corn crops in the area. As corn approaches the V3 growth stage, I have found that populations are lower than what was planted due to issues with sidewall compaction.
 

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17

May

2018

Agronomy Update: Herbicide Injury Diagnosis in Corn

Author: Chad Kalaher

I wanted to share with you some observations I have seen in corn after fielding some chemical complaints over the last few days. 

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12

Apr

2017

Agronomy Update

Burndown Options, Planting Behind Anhydrous Ammonia and Black Cutworm

Author: Luke Schulte

As we prepare for planting, there are a number of things to keep in mind. From burndown to weed and pest control, there are factors to consider that will ultimately affect the season ahead.  

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21

Jul

2016

Agronomy Update

Green Snap Presence in Iowa

Author: Pat Holloway

Most parts of Iowa experienced conditions that were drier and warmer than usual throughout the month of June. Recently though, we received some much needed rain. Unfortunately, in some instances, these rains were accompanied by high winds and thunderstorms which occurred just prior to corn tasseling in many fields. High winds just prior to tassel can cause green snap (brittle snap) in corn.

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5

Jul

2016

Agronomy Update

How to Get the Most Out of Liberty® Herbicide

Author: Austin Scott

At the moment, Liberty® (glufosinate) is the only post-emergence herbicide available to control glyphosate and PPO-resistant Palmer amaranth and waterhemp. So naturally, we need this herbicide to perform to the best of its ability. There are a few things you can do to enhance the efficacy of your LibertyLink® herbicide program. Below I have outlined the best management practices for post-emergence Liberty applications.



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23

Jun

2016

Agronomy Update

Protect Your Corn from Yield Robbing Pests

Author: Jon Skinner

Protecting corn from yield-robbing pests is one of the greatest concerns for farmers each year. From late June to mid-July these pests include foliar diseases and silk clipping insects. Properly managing these pests is crucial, and we can start by getting a better understanding of the economic and agronomic factors of each specific field. 

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17

May

2016

Agronomy Update

Ohio Fields Showing Signs of Frost Damage

Author: Alex Johnson

The cool temperatures we have experienced over the last several nights have led to questions regarding frost damage. We are seeing some signs of frost damage here at our Ohio Practical Farm Research (PFR)® location, however we won’t know the severity of this damage until three to five days following the frost event. With the low temperatures leading up to this recent frost event, the hardening off process had started making our crops more tolerant of cool temperatures. Wet soils and dew present helps to maintain soil temperatures, thereby decreasing the risk of injury.

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20

Oct

2015

NW Illinois & Iowa - Craig Kilby, CCA

Fall Fertility Decisions

Author: Craig Kilby

Fall fertility decisions in northwest Illinois have traditionally been based on crop removal and recent soil test levels. That may remain unchanged for some in 2015, while others may find the need to adjust levels lower due to economics. The cost to apply major nutrients like P and K have not dropped at the same rate as grain prices, resulting in heightened interest of economical use of these nutrients. Referring to soil test information, P and K can be allocated to only those areas most likely to respond to applications. Be sure to review critical levels of nutrients for corn, soybean, wheat, and alfalfa. The probability and magnitude of return to P and K fertilizer will increase when applied to soil test levels below the critical level.

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20

Oct

2015

S. Indiana - Steve Gauck, CCA

Evaluate Fungicide Applications During Harvest

Author: Steve Gauck

This year can be called the year of leaf diseases! We have seen gray leaf spot, northern corn leaf blight, and even southern rust. Corn has filled out well, but stalk quality is a concern as plants have cannibalized with the late dry stress. Harvest will be a chance for us to evaluate our fungicide applications. Many diseases came in late and the residual from the fungicide may be gone. In some cases, these diseases may not have affected yield dramatically. If you are planning to go corn after corn, consider what diseases you had and plant a hybrid with good tolerance to them.

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20

Oct

2015

Missouri - David Hughes, CCA

Time to Grow Winter Wheat in Missouri

Author: David Hughes

Throughout the month of August I had the privilege to work alongside Beck’s Practical Farm Research (PFR)® staff, conducting agronomy research tours at Beck’s Field Shows at both our Henderson, KY and Effingham, IL locations as well as Becknology™ Days in Atlanta, IN. Beck’s PFR program embodies the essence of Beck’s values (teamwork, integrity, innovation, adaptability, commitment, and passion) like no other agronomy program with which I have been associated. From the beginning, Beck’s founders have demonstrated a passion for observing and measuring the components of successful crop production from which they adapt and innovate to improve production systems. The PFR program is the natural evolution of this process, and its research data is now something we as Missouri farmers can access and deploy in our corn, soybean, and wheat production systems.

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20

Sep

2015

S. Indiana - Steve Gauck, CCA

Good Planting Seasons Start with Harvest

Author: Steve Gauck

This is our one last chance to scout fields and evaluate the year before harvest begins. As you walk corn fields, be sure to evaluate disease levels and look to see which hybrids handled diseases better. Ask yourself if you are happy with your fungicide applications. Look at grain fill and pollination. Take a final assessment of weed control, record notes on what weeds are present and if they need to be targeted next year. In soybeans, be on the lookout for Palmer amaranth. It has been identified in southern Indiana and we do not want to run the combine through a patch of it and spread the seeds out.

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20

Sep

2015

NW Illinois & Iowa - Craig Kilby, CCA

Scouting Fields And Residue Management

Author: Craig Kilby

Before harvest begins, take this last opportunity to scout fields and evaluate the crop in corn fields, pay close attention to the disease levels and note hybrids which handled disease better. Are you happy with your fungicide decisions and applications? Make a final assessment of weed control, noting which weeds are present and if they need to be targeted next year. In soybeans, check for insect and disease pressure and be on the lookout for Palmer amaranth. It has been identified in many areas of northwest Illinois and you don’t want to run your combine through a patch of it when each plant may contain one million seeds. If you suspect a new weed in your fields this fall, call your Becks dealer or agronomist to identify it.

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20

Sep

2015

Missouri - David Hughes, CCA

Soil Testing Game Plan

Author: David Hughes

As combines roll during harvest, be ready with a soil testing game-plan. Optimum crop nutrition requires an accurate inventory of the critical nutrients in your soil. Prioritize fields to include: newly acquired fields; fields that have not been soil tested within the past three years, and fields with observed nutrient deficiencies.

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20

Aug

2015

NW Illinois - Craig Kilby, CCA

Take Time To Discover The “Why” In Your Fields

Author: Craig Kilby

With the completion of late-season applications, corn and soybeans are advancing quickly to maturity. But before the combines roll, take the opportunity to evaluate management decisions made throughout the season. Significant differences become more evident as the crop finishes its reproductive phase. The combine will tell us the results, but the most important knowledge is the “why”. Take time, prior to harvest, to discover the “why” in your fields.

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20

Aug

2015

S. Indiana - Steve Gauck, CCA

Evaluating Corn and Soybean Crops

Author: Steve Gauck

What a year it has been. As we evaluate our crop in August, we have a great opportunity to take a hard look at yield potential and yield loss suffered this year. As you walk corn fields, pull ears and check for pollination problems. If you see some, think back to pollination time. Was it dry, wet, hot or cold? We lost a lot of nitrogen early. Are ears stunted?

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20

Aug

2015

Missouri - David Hughes, CCA

Harvest Is A Key Time To Learn

Author: David Hughes

Every year at this time I still feel that back-to-school excitement when I watch my children get ready to make the transition from the fun summer break back to more disciplined learning. As farmers, harvest is one of our key times to learn. Today’s technology enables us to gather valuable data at the same time we harvest the yield from a long season’s work. If you use a yield monitor, prepare for accurate yield data collection by going through your technology supplier’s preharvest maintenance checklist.

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