Agronomy Talk

3

Oct

2019

Agronomy Talk: Harvesting Down Corn

Author: Jon Skinner

Harvesting downed corn is one of the worst jobs on the farm. Year in and year out, there are many abiotic stresses or plant pathogens that will affect standability and ease of harvesting a corn crop. One of the most prevalent issues causing decreased standability of corn is the presence of crown rot and stalk rots. These diseases take advantage of compromised stalk tissue, and degrading it below the ear causing lodging and stalk breakage. There are, however, ways to improve the process of harvesting downed corn that can make it much smoother.

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3

Oct

2019

Agronomy Talk: Short Husking

Author: Eric Wilson

Short husking is best described as “corn ears outgrowing their husks.” It results in more exposure of the ear tips to environmental conditions and increases the potential for reduced grain quality.

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17

Sep

2019

Agronomy Talk: Ear Drop

Author: Luke Schulte

Ears on the ground prior to harvest is frustrating and often misunderstood. Pest damage, weather stress, reduced nitrogen (N) uptake, and genetics can all contribute to dropped ears. However, identifying the causal agent may help you implement strategies and management practices to minimize ear drop in the future.

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7

Nov

2016

Agronomy Update

Dust It In, Bust the Bin!

Author: Austin Scott

Even though wheat acres are down quite a bit this year, I’ve seen a lot of drills running through fields over the past month. I’ve also heard the old adage, “dust it in, bust the bin” more times than I can count. While it was ok at first, it’s now starting to worry me. 

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28

Sep

2016

Agronomy Update

Soybeans Not Fit to Harvest?

Author: Luke Schulte

“Harvest time is here but my soybeans won’t get fit to harvest!”

A very common, yet intriguing question many farmers have had this fall. I’ve heard numerous remarks such as “my 3.5 maturity soybeans will be ready before my 2.9 soybeans and I planted them at the same time!” So why are soybeans maturing inconsistently? 

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22

Sep

2016

Agronomy Update

Identifying Corn Ear Molds In Your Fields

Author: Jon Skinner

Conditions throughout many parts of Wisconsin and northern Illinois have been favorable for the development of corn ear molds. Ear molds are of particular concern because of the adverse effects they can have on grain storage. They also result in the development of mycotoxins, which can have detrimental effects on feed value and animal health. 

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20

Sep

2016

Agronomy Update

Stalk Rot in Corn? Time to Prioritize Harvest!

Author: Austin Scott

Harvest time is finally here and for most of us in the South, this will be the year to forget! Parts of Tennessee encountered the worst drought we’ve seen since 2012. On the other end of the spectrum, parts of Kentucky, southern Indiana, and southern Illinois caught more rain than they could handle for most of the year. The Missouri Bootheel couldn’t make up its mind if it wanted to be too dry or too wet! All of these crazy environmental conditions have led to some serious standability issues in our corn. Just about every corn field I’ve been in recently has shown signs of premature death and stalk rot. This is something we see every year, but some years are worse than others and may require a little more planning before harvest.

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20

Oct

2015

S. Illinois - Jonathan Perkins, CCA

Evaluations During Harvest

When the combine hits the field, I always feel a sense of accomplishment. On the research farm, harvest is one of the most exciting times of the season. We get to see the results of our hard work come to fruition. During harvest, we remain observant to provide you with agronomic explanations. This season, we will likely see every ditch or change in slope of ground that may have been wet longer. We will take note of this and evaluate how it affects our plots to bring you the most accurate information to help you make better management decisions on your farms! I encourage each of you to do the same on your own fields as you go through harvest.

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20

Oct

2015

S. Indiana - Steve Gauck, CCA

Evaluate Fungicide Applications During Harvest

Author: Steve Gauck

This year can be called the year of leaf diseases! We have seen gray leaf spot, northern corn leaf blight, and even southern rust. Corn has filled out well, but stalk quality is a concern as plants have cannibalized with the late dry stress. Harvest will be a chance for us to evaluate our fungicide applications. Many diseases came in late and the residual from the fungicide may be gone. In some cases, these diseases may not have affected yield dramatically. If you are planning to go corn after corn, consider what diseases you had and plant a hybrid with good tolerance to them.

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20

Oct

2015

Ohio - Alex Johnson, CCA

Make Product Evaluations at Harvest

Author: Alex Johnson

Harvest is in full swing and now is the time for product evaluations. Many farmers I know do not walk their fields at length to evaluate corn and soybean variety performance on their farm during the summer, but during harvest, you’ve got the best seat in the house — right behind the header. Use this opportunity to jot some notes down as you go from field to field and variety to variety.

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20

Sep

2015

Ohio - Alex Johnson, CCA

Thoughts Prior to Harvest

Author: Alex Johnson

One tendency among farmers with rotor combines is to run the rotor too slow. This grinds material more, moves material slower, and produces more fines to clean out. If the concave is too far open or closed, it can break grain. Book settings will normally get you pretty close when setting your combine.

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20

Sep

2015

S. Indiana - Steve Gauck, CCA

Good Planting Seasons Start with Harvest

Author: Steve Gauck

This is our one last chance to scout fields and evaluate the year before harvest begins. As you walk corn fields, be sure to evaluate disease levels and look to see which hybrids handled diseases better. Ask yourself if you are happy with your fungicide applications. Look at grain fill and pollination. Take a final assessment of weed control, record notes on what weeds are present and if they need to be targeted next year. In soybeans, be on the lookout for Palmer amaranth. It has been identified in southern Indiana and we do not want to run the combine through a patch of it and spread the seeds out.

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