Agronomy Talk

22

Jun

2018

Agronomy Update: Residual Herbicides for Use in Double Crop or High Biomass Situations

Author: Austin Scott

I recently attended Dr. Larry Steckel's University of Tennessee Weed Tour and I wanted to give you an update on a few of the new herbicide programs that are coming out that can be used in double crop or high biomass situations.

Check out the video below to see the difference in residual formulations from this cover crop termination study.

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21

Jun

2018

Agronomy Update: Phytophthora Root Rot vs. Fusarium Wilt

Author: Steve Gauck

Do you know the difference between Phytophthora Root Rot and Fusarium Wilt in soybeans?

Check out this quick Agronomy Update video from Beck's agronomist, Steve Gauck to learn more about the signs and symptoms of both diseases, and how to tell the difference in the field.

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16

Aug

2017

Agronomy Update

Southern Rust vs Common Rust: What You Need to Know

Author: Steve Gauck

In 2016, many parts of southern Indiana experienced a bad outbreak of Southern Rust that caused yield loss in a lot of areas. Many farmers have seen an influx of this disease present in their fields again this year. However, there has also been a large presence of Common Rust in corn fields this year as well.
 
Check out this latest video to learn more about the visual differences between the two diseases and what you can expect in terms of long term effects and yield loss. 

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16

Aug

2017

Agronomy Update

The Truth About Stink Bugs...

Author: Luke Schulte

This is a vulnerable time during soybean development as we enter pod development so it's important to scout your fields for insect feeding. A recently shot this video while scouting soybean fields at Beck's Practical Farm Research (PFR)® site in London, OH for insect damage, specifically from stink bugs.

Watch it now to learn more about what to look for and what kind of injury you can expect.

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5

Jul

2017

AGRONOMY UPDATE

The Importance of Nitrogen Timing and Placement

Author: David Hughes

Nitrogen (N) application timing and placement is important to farmers in Missouri who face nitrogen loss from denitrification and leaching.

In this latest agronomy upate, I am joined by our summer intern, Amy Johnson, and PFR Partner, Adam Casner, as we discuss the PFR Partners study taking place near Carrollton, MO

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30

Jun

2017

Agronomy Update

Soybean Post Spray Reminders

Author: Luke Schulte

Today, it’s not nearly as simple to achieve adequate weed control in soybeans as it was 10 years ago. Weeds have evolved and herbicide resistance has created some considerable challenges over time. Below are a few reminders of management practices you might consider with your specific soybean technology.

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7

Jun

2017

AGRONOMY UPDATE

Purple Corn Syndrome

Author: Luke Schulte

It’s not uncommon for me this time of year to receive calls regarding corn plants turning purple. While it’s not unusual, it is important to understand the underlying cause and, more importantly, that in most cases this condition is temporary and cosmetic, and will not impact yield. 

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19

May

2017

Agronomy Update

Rain, Rain, Go Away

There is no better time to experience the benefits of water management than after a big rainfall event. And Mother Nature has provided more than enough of those this season.

Fields across the Midwest have been flooded and tractors put on standby as farmers across the Corn Belt waited out torrential rains and wet fields over the last few weeks. Some fields however, fared better than others. Their secret you ask? Well water management of course!

Comments (0) Number of views (3375)

2

Jan

2017

Agronomy Update

Soil Tests 101: How to Read Your Results

Author: Austin Scott

One of the staples for growing healthy, high-yielding crops is to maintain good soil fertility. That’s why most agronomists will suggest soil sampling every two to three years to evaluate how your fields are holding up. These tests however are not always the easiest to read and many farmers often need help interpreting the results. Here are some key tips and areas to focus on when evaluating your soil test report. 

Comments (0) Number of views (4643)

13

Oct

2016

Agronomy Update

Controlling Winter Annual Weeds

Author: David Hughes

The time spent in the combine is perfect for scouting winter annual weeds while monitoring your harvest operations. A winter annual weed is just like it sounds… an annual weed with a life cycle that begins in the fall and may go dormant during the winter before maturing and dying in the spring. With this type of life cycle, winter annual weeds were less of a concern in past years because they weren’t considered to be competitive with a growing summer crop, and conventional tillage practices took care of them before planting. 

Comments (0) Number of views (6395)

26

Sep

2016

Agronomy Update

15 Tips for Successfully Growing Soft Red Winter Wheat in the Midwest

Author: Chad Kalaher
  1. Variety Selection. Select varieties that are best suited for your operation’s needs, whether that’s based on maturity for harvest timing and soybean double-cropping, straw and/or grain yield, management level, or a combination of these needs. In addition, maturity and harvest timing may be important for timely manure management, summer drainage tile projects, or timely cover-crop seeding. Utilize data from universities, third-party testing services, seed companies, and local performance-based product recommendations from your Beck’s representative to help select the best varieties available. University of Illinois research from 2013 and 2014 shows a 20 percent difference in grain yield just by selecting top-performing wheat varieties.
Comments (0) Number of views (11285)

21

Jul

2016

Agronomy Update

Green Snap Presence in Iowa

Author: Pat Holloway

Most parts of Iowa experienced conditions that were drier and warmer than usual throughout the month of June. Recently though, we received some much needed rain. Unfortunately, in some instances, these rains were accompanied by high winds and thunderstorms which occurred just prior to corn tasseling in many fields. High winds just prior to tassel can cause green snap (brittle snap) in corn.

Comments (0) Number of views (6133)

20

Jul

2016

Agronomy Update

Fungicides, Insecticides and Disease Development...

Author: Chad Kalaher

I have received a number of calls from customers over the past few weeks, so I wanted to provide some updates on a few of the hot topics as we continue to monitor the development of our corn and soybean crops. 

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20

Jul

2016

Agronomy Update

How Stressed Did Your Corn Get?

The stressful growing conditions we experienced over the last month are in the rear view and we are wrapping up what has been an ideal period of weather during pollination. But many are wondering how does drought and extreme heat (similar to what we’ve experienced) affect corn during its vegetative growth stages? For the sake of being objective, let’s take a look at a reliable resource to determine how critical the hot, dry conditions were to your area.

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5

Jul

2016

Agronomy Update

How to Get the Most Out of Liberty® Herbicide

Author: Austin Scott

At the moment, Liberty® (glufosinate) is the only post-emergence herbicide available to control glyphosate and PPO-resistant Palmer amaranth and waterhemp. So naturally, we need this herbicide to perform to the best of its ability. There are a few things you can do to enhance the efficacy of your LibertyLink® herbicide program. Below I have outlined the best management practices for post-emergence Liberty applications.



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30

Jun

2016

Agronomy Update

Ohio Fields Showing Signs of Phytophthora Root Rot

Author: Mark Apelt

Over the last few days, many farmers in Ohio and eastern Indiana have noticed some patches or large areas that appear to be wilting, turning yellow or brown, and dying. Below are just a few photos of the symptoms we are seeing.

Comments (0) Number of views (7175)

24

Jun

2016

Agronomy Update

Should You Spray a Fungicide?

Author: Austin Scott

A lot of our early planted corn is already in the reproductive stage, or will be within the next week. A majority of the phone calls I’ve recently received are from farmers asking “should I spray a fungicide?” This is a tricky question. On one hand, you don’t want to throw money at a corn crop when it’s not warranted, but on the other hand you don’t want to lose potential yield by not protecting your crop. So the million-dollar question is, “what should I do?”

Comments (0) Number of views (6968)

22

Jun

2016

Agronomy Update

Storm Winds and Heavy Rain Cause Root Lodging in Missouri Fields

Author: David Hughes

We received high storm winds with rainfall Monday night in much of Northern Missouri and there are a lot of acres with corn blown over or down (root lodging). I have not heard of any significant greensnap which is good.

Here are a few key points to remember... 

Comments (0) Number of views (6614)

22

Jun

2016

Agronomy Update

Wheat Harvest + Double Crop Soybeans

Author: Steve Gauck

With wheat harvest officially underway across southern Indiana, I wanted to offer you a few tips about harvest and planting double crop soybeans.

When preparing to harvest wheat, the ideal moisture is between 14 to 20 percent. Below 14 percent moisture we start to see yield loss and we could also run the risk of a rain lowering test weight and quality. Air drying wheat will give you the best quality. For long-term storage, make sure to dry your wheat to 12.5 percent moisture.

Comments (0) Number of views (5757)

8

Jun

2016

Agronomy Update

Ohio Field Observations: Fertilizer Burn

Author: Mark Apelt

A large percentage of Ohio’s corn acres were put in the ground over the last few weeks. Since then, the warm temperatures have caused corn to emerge rather quickly, in approximately five days vs. the April planted corn which, in some cases, took up to three weeks! As our customers are out scouting their fields, several of them have noticed a reduced stand and wondering what the causes might have been...

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