Agronomy Talk

19

Jun

2019

Agronomy Talk: Late-Planted Corn

Author: Luke Schulte

Broad areas of the Corn Belt have experienced one of the most challenging planting season in recent memory. Farmers did what they do best, and bided their time for a planting window. Corn acres from South Dakota to Ohio were planted weeks later than what is typical. And while many farmers are already worn out from the extended planting season, most are more nervous about what’s to come.

The good news is that late planted acres still have great yield potential. If Mother Nature starts cooperating, this season has abundant hope of producing competitive yields.

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28

Apr

2017

Agronomy Update

Preventing Fusarium Head Scab in Your Wheat

Author: Steve Gauck

Scouting your wheat now is critical to preventing Fusarium head scab in your fields. Get to know and understand the wheat growth stages and timing and be prepared to apply fungicide when necessary.

 

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10

May

2016

Agronomy Update

What to Scout for in May

Author: David Hughes

May can be a busy month. Most of us are planting soybeans, post-spraying corn, spraying burndown ahead of beans, and/or checking on maturing wheat. We have a lot happening all at the same time.

With that in mind, I thought I’d share some of the things I keep an eye on and field scout for during this busy month. My intent with this article is not to give you a “how-to” for each of these, but rather to let you know what you should be looking for and thinking about from a crop diagnostic perspective.

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20

Sep

2015

Ohio - Alex Johnson, CCA

Thoughts Prior to Harvest

Author: Alex Johnson

One tendency among farmers with rotor combines is to run the rotor too slow. This grinds material more, moves material slower, and produces more fines to clean out. If the concave is too far open or closed, it can break grain. Book settings will normally get you pretty close when setting your combine.

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20

Jul

2015

Ohio - Alex Johnson, CCA

Maintain Established Yield Potential

Author: Alex Johnson

Farmers are always looking forward. This time of year, crops are growing fast and the hardest work of the year is behind us. We are looking forward and keeping an eye on our fields to make sure the yield potential we established thus far is maintained. 

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20

Jul

2015

N. Indiana & Michigan - Denny Cobb, CPAG

Continue Scouting to Keep Disease and Pests in Check

Author: Denny Cobb

Soybean cyst nematode sampling is best done six to eight weeks after planting. Target fields where yields have plateaued, areas with pH>7, and areas where weed control is lacking.

Comments (0) Number of views (5088)

22

Jun

2015

Agronomy Update

Stink Bug Damage and Yellow Corn Leaves

Author: Denny Cobb

In her fourth week of scouting central Indiana fields, sales intern Christy Kettler has been noticing some additional stressors to corn plants currently in the V5 growth stage. See her report below to learn more about the stink bug damage and yellow leaves she has been seeing, as well as her trap findings and what you can expect in the coming weeks. 

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20

May

2015

S. Indiana - Steve Gauck, CCA

Scout & Evaluate Planting

Author: Steve Gauck

Wheat can become the forgotten crop this time of year. We had a tough winter, but overall wheat looks good. As you scout your wheat, keep an eye out for leaf diseases and any weeds that may have escaped. If you only scout wheat once, make sure to pay close attention at flowering. If we have wet weather, make sure to apply a fungicide for head scab! 

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20

May

2015

N. Indiana & Michigan - Denny Cobb, CPAG

Know Your Soil for Multiple Nitrogen Applications

Author: Denny Cobb

Nitrogen (N) management is a key yield component. I like to see multiple N “meals” served to corn prior to tasseling. The main reason for this is how much N your soils can hold at any one time. A general rule of thumb is 10 lbs. N for every CEC unit. As an example, a sandy loam soil with a CEC of 6 theoretically can only “hold” 60 lbs. N at any one application. Conversely, a silty clay loam soil with a CEC of 18 can “hold” 180 lbs. N at any one application. 

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20

May

2015

NW Illinois & Iowa - Craig Kilby, CCA

Assess Crop Input Decisions

Author: Craig Kilby

As the calendar rolls into May, it becomes an ideal time to assess the performance of several crop input decisions. Decisions such as planting depth, population, seedbed preparation, stand establishment, fertilizer applications, nutrition plans, and insect management are all fresh in your mind. Make small observations today and record them to help further interpret harvest yield and field performance later this season. Make a checklist of the following items as you investigate your fields: 

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20

May

2015

NE Illinois & NW Indiana - Chad Kalaher, CCA

Scout Early for Best Management Options

Author: Chad Kalaher

Depending on corn and soybean planting dates and growing conditions, late May is usually an optimum time to scout fields for earlyseason crop protection and management needs. Evaluate the weed control performance of pre-plant/pre-emerge herbicides and the potential need for a post-emerge application. 

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