Agronomy Talk

24

Oct

2018

Agronomy Update: Late-Season Soybean Disease, Plant Response and Impact on Seed Quality

Author: David Hughes

In this latest agronomy update, Beck’s Field Agronomist, David Hugues, addresses some of the seed quality issues farmers have been seeing in soybean fields across Missouri.

Comments (0) Number of views (1291)

17

Oct

2018

Agronomy Talk: Seed Quality in Soybeans

High rainfall and warm temperatures after maturity physically cause the soybean pod to swell and shrink. Any structural weakness in the pod from diseases or insect feeding will allow moisture into the pod where it affects the soybean itself. The pods then split open from the physical stress of swelling with moisture. Soybeans exposed to warm temperature and high moisture are also subject to germinating in the pod. All soybean varieties are susceptible to damage in exceptionally wet years. 

Comments (0) Number of views (1063)

16

Aug

2017

Agronomy Update

Southern Rust vs Common Rust: What You Need to Know

Author: Steve Gauck

In 2016, many parts of southern Indiana experienced a bad outbreak of Southern Rust that caused yield loss in a lot of areas. Many farmers have seen an influx of this disease present in their fields again this year. However, there has also been a large presence of Common Rust in corn fields this year as well.
 
Check out this latest video to learn more about the visual differences between the two diseases and what you can expect in terms of long term effects and yield loss. 

Comments (0) Number of views (3360)

16

Aug

2017

Agronomy Update

The Truth About Stink Bugs...

Author: Luke Schulte

This is a vulnerable time during soybean development as we enter pod development so it's important to scout your fields for insect feeding. A recently shot this video while scouting soybean fields at Beck's Practical Farm Research (PFR)® site in London, OH for insect damage, specifically from stink bugs.

Watch it now to learn more about what to look for and what kind of injury you can expect.

Comments (0) Number of views (3589)

21

Jun

2017

Agronomy Update

I Like Big Roots and I Cannot Lie...

Author: Pat Holloway

Bigger roots? Taller plants? Yes please! 

This year, Beck’s PFR team in Iowa is conducting a FurrowJet™ study to test fertilizer placements and rates to find the most effective method for delivering fertilizer to the plant.

Comments (0) Number of views (3729)

19

May

2017

Agronomy Update

Rain, Rain, Go Away

There is no better time to experience the benefits of water management than after a big rainfall event. And Mother Nature has provided more than enough of those this season.

Fields across the Midwest have been flooded and tractors put on standby as farmers across the Corn Belt waited out torrential rains and wet fields over the last few weeks. Some fields however, fared better than others. Their secret you ask? Well water management of course!

Comments (0) Number of views (3375)

14

Mar

2017

Agronomy Update

Optimum Missouri Planting Dates

Author: Alex Long

We are midway through March and have experienced some above average temperatures that have left many of us feeling as though our corn planters should be running. We have actually heard a few reports of corn being planted around the state, but I believe it is in your best interest to be patient and postpone your planting operations for just a little bit longer.

Comments (0) Number of views (3962)

9

Jan

2017

Agronomy Update

Weed Control Reminders

Author: David Hughes

Happy New Year from your Beck’s Missouri agronomy team! Alex, Clint, Norm, Matt and I look forward to the opportunity to help you succeed in 2017. With timely information, research, field diagnosis and experience, our goal is to help you make this year the most profitable it can be. Growing row crops in a low market environment can be challenging and requires us to sharpen and apply our management skills.  

Comments (0) Number of views (4602)

27

Apr

2015

Agronomy Update

Corn and Soybean Plantability Tips

Author: Denny Cobb

Smaller sized seed corn will be the norm for 2015. As you know, this is a result of an excellent growing season which had very few stressors during the pollination and grain fill periods. Overall, smaller size seed corn poses fewer planting challenges than heavier, larger sized seed. Here are a few pointers for planting small size corn seed.

Comments (0) Number of views (9260)

20

Apr

2015

Agronomy Update

Spring Ammonia Applications and Corn Planting Concerns

Author: Denny Cobb

Last fall was not very conducive for applying ammonia (NH3), which brings us to our current situation concerning spring applications. Couple that with wet soils, cooler daytime temperatures this week, and the need to begin corn planting, there are areas of concern! Here are my recommendations regarding spring applications of NH3.

Comments (0) Number of views (8232)

16

Apr

2015

Agronomy Update

Introducing Your New Beck's Missouri Agronomist

Author: David Hughes

Hello, I’m David Hughes, your new Beck’s agronomist in Missouri. I wanted to take the time to introduce myself to the Beck’s family of employees, dealers and customers, and especially to Missouri farmers whom I now have opportunity to serve as a Beck’s agronomist. I am grateful for the opportunity to be a part of a company that shares my passion and love of God, family, our country, and farming.

Comments (0) Number of views (8162)

7

Aug

2014

Iowa & NW Illinois - Craig Kilby, CCA

Our 2014 growing season may be headed for the record books.

Author: Craig Kilby
Our 2014 growing season may be headed for the record books. Weather has been nearly ideal across
much of the area.
Comments (0) Number of views (5106)

7

Aug

2014

S. Illinois & Missouri - Jonathan Perkins, CCA

Corn and Soybean Crops are on their way to Maturity

With the majority of late season applications now complete, corn and soybean crops are on their way
to maturity. Now is the time to evaluate what we did throughout the season.
Comments (0) Number of views (5469)

7

Aug

2014

S. Indiana - Steve Gauck, CCA

Hot, Cool, Wet, Dry - We Have had Quite the Summer.

Author: Steve Gauck
Hot, cool, wet, dry - we have had quite the summer. In August, we have a great opportunity to take a hard look at yield potential and yield loss.
Comments (0) Number of views (4879)

7

Aug

2014

NE Illinois & NW Indiana - Chad Kalaher, CCA

With High Corn Yields, Fall Residue Management Becomes Very Critical.

Author: Chad Kalaher
Although weather has led to crop development challenges in some areas, harvest will soon begin on a much anticipated large corn crop. Stress during pollination through the first half of July was minimal. With a few exceptions, disease and insect pressure has been relatively low in most fields.
Comments (0) Number of views (5244)

7

Aug

2014

N. Indiana & Michigan - Denny Cobb, CPAg

Crop Potential Looks Awesome

Author: Denny Cobb
Our corn crop potential looks awesome in our area as I’m sure it does in many other areas. Fungicide spray decisions were made on a field by field basis considering the best IPM strategies and recommendations as it relates to managing gray leaf spot and northern corn leaf blight.
Comments (0) Number of views (5099)

7

Aug

2014

E. Indiana & Ohio

Corn Diseases will be Greater than Normal in 2014

Author: Mark Apelt
Chances are good that corn diseases will be greater than normal in 2014. There are several reasons why this may be the case. Relative humidity levels have been very high compared with the last five years.
Comments (0) Number of views (5621)

1

Jul

2014

E. Indiana & Ohio

Think About What Changes You May Want To Make For Next Year

Author: Mark Apelt

This is always a fun, yet often stressful, time of year. Our crops are in the ground, we are watching them grow, and waiting in anticipation for what harvest will bring to us. While you are watching, think about what changes you may want to make for next year. Did your planter work the way you wanted? Are you spotting any nutrient deficiencies? Have you taken tissue samples to know what your plants need? Have you dug up your root systems to check for potential insect damage or compaction layers? I would encourage each one of you to call your Beck’s dealer or seed advisor to walk fields and discuss plans for next year. A good plan makes for a successful year.

Comments (0) Number of views (5257)

1

Jul

2014

N. Indiana & Michigan

Now is the Time for Close Monitoring of Root Establishment

Author: Denny Cobb

The western half of my area has been exceptionally dry this spring, allowing for rapid corn and soybean planting. By May 10, most farmers have completed their operations. The central, eastern and northern areas have been about seven days behind due to cooler soil temperatures and greater soil moisture conditions. However, warmer air temperatures allowed them to complete planting around Mother’s Day. Regardless of location, now is the time for close monitoring of root establishment. Corn should be checked frequently from emergence to the V6 stage of growth. Stunting or restrictions of the root system during this time can have an adverse effect on the future development of the entire plant. Some things to watch for are excessively dry or wet soil conditions, cold soil temperatures, insect or herbicide damage, and sidewall or tillage compaction. Corn, if planted deep enough, will develop four nodal root systems below ground. These “money roots” contribute greatly to maximizing kernel row potential.

Comments (0) Number of views (4953)

1

Jul

2014

S. Indiana

Scouting is Critical and is a Great Time to Evaluate

Author: Steve Gauck

Scouting is critical and is a great time to evaluate your stands and planter performance. As corn reaches V4-V6, it is transitioning from getting energy from the seed to the roots. Take time to dig plants now and look at root health. Also, remember to look for sidewall compaction. These things help you plan for next year, or give the chance to improve this crop. We also need to be looking at our weed control. We want post applications to target weeds smaller than 4 in. tall. If you used a pre-emerge herbicide, did you get the control you wanted? What weeds escaped, should you look at a different program next year? Sidedress nitrogen applications are also being made. If you are concerned about how much nitrogen (N) to apply, you can take a tissue test, or a pre-sidedress nitrate test (PSNT) to determine how much N is there and set your rates from that information. Our PFR® studies show the economic return on N over the past five years has been 178 units of applied N in corn following soybeans.

Comments (0) Number of views (4988)
RSS
12

Connect with us

        


Follow us on Pinterest Follow us on Pinterest