Agronomy Talk

22

Jun

2018

Agronomy Update: Residual Herbicides for Use in Double Crop or High Biomass Situations

Author: Austin Scott

I recently attended Dr. Larry Steckel's University of Tennessee Weed Tour and I wanted to give you an update on a few of the new herbicide programs that are coming out that can be used in double crop or high biomass situations.

Check out the video below to see the difference in residual formulations from this cover crop termination study.

Comments (0) Number of views (3658)

5

Jul

2017

AGRONOMY UPDATE

The Importance of Nitrogen Timing and Placement

Author: David Hughes

Nitrogen (N) application timing and placement is important to farmers in Missouri who face nitrogen loss from denitrification and leaching.

In this latest agronomy upate, I am joined by our summer intern, Amy Johnson, and PFR Partner, Adam Casner, as we discuss the PFR Partners study taking place near Carrollton, MO

Comments (0) Number of views (3387)

30

Jun

2017

Agronomy Update

Soybean Post Spray Reminders

Author: Luke Schulte

Today, it’s not nearly as simple to achieve adequate weed control in soybeans as it was 10 years ago. Weeds have evolved and herbicide resistance has created some considerable challenges over time. Below are a few reminders of management practices you might consider with your specific soybean technology.

Comments (0) Number of views (4272)

21

Jun

2017

Agronomy Update

I Like Big Roots and I Cannot Lie...

Author: Pat Holloway

Bigger roots? Taller plants? Yes please! 

This year, Beck’s PFR team in Iowa is conducting a FurrowJet™ study to test fertilizer placements and rates to find the most effective method for delivering fertilizer to the plant.

Comments (0) Number of views (3723)

7

Jun

2017

AGRONOMY UPDATE

Purple Corn Syndrome

Author: Luke Schulte

It’s not uncommon for me this time of year to receive calls regarding corn plants turning purple. While it’s not unusual, it is important to understand the underlying cause and, more importantly, that in most cases this condition is temporary and cosmetic, and will not impact yield. 

Comments (0) Number of views (3506)

20

Oct

2015

NW Illinois & Iowa - Craig Kilby, CCA

Fall Fertility Decisions

Author: Craig Kilby

Fall fertility decisions in northwest Illinois have traditionally been based on crop removal and recent soil test levels. That may remain unchanged for some in 2015, while others may find the need to adjust levels lower due to economics. The cost to apply major nutrients like P and K have not dropped at the same rate as grain prices, resulting in heightened interest of economical use of these nutrients. Referring to soil test information, P and K can be allocated to only those areas most likely to respond to applications. Be sure to review critical levels of nutrients for corn, soybean, wheat, and alfalfa. The probability and magnitude of return to P and K fertilizer will increase when applied to soil test levels below the critical level.

Comments (0) Number of views (4135)

20

Oct

2015

E. Indiana & W. Ohio - Brent Minett, CCA

Stalk Quality and Harvest Prioritization

Author: Brent Minett

Stalk quality can be negatively affected by three factors: disease, nutrient deficiency, and environment. Fungal diseases like fusarium, anthracnose, and gibberella stalk rot cause decay of the internal pith tissues of the stalk. Nitrogen deficiency can lead to the ear cannibalizing the stalk to feed itself. Extended straight line winds in excess of 60 mph can cause any hybrid to lodge; especially those fields that have experienced stress from the other two factors. Harvest prioritization will be especially important this fall.

Comments (0) Number of views (3646)

20

Oct

2015

S. Indiana - Steve Gauck, CCA

Evaluate Fungicide Applications During Harvest

Author: Steve Gauck

This year can be called the year of leaf diseases! We have seen gray leaf spot, northern corn leaf blight, and even southern rust. Corn has filled out well, but stalk quality is a concern as plants have cannibalized with the late dry stress. Harvest will be a chance for us to evaluate our fungicide applications. Many diseases came in late and the residual from the fungicide may be gone. In some cases, these diseases may not have affected yield dramatically. If you are planning to go corn after corn, consider what diseases you had and plant a hybrid with good tolerance to them.

Comments (0) Number of views (3839)

20

Oct

2015

Missouri - David Hughes, CCA

Time to Grow Winter Wheat in Missouri

Author: David Hughes

Throughout the month of August I had the privilege to work alongside Beck’s Practical Farm Research (PFR)® staff, conducting agronomy research tours at Beck’s Field Shows at both our Henderson, KY and Effingham, IL locations as well as Becknology™ Days in Atlanta, IN. Beck’s PFR program embodies the essence of Beck’s values (teamwork, integrity, innovation, adaptability, commitment, and passion) like no other agronomy program with which I have been associated. From the beginning, Beck’s founders have demonstrated a passion for observing and measuring the components of successful crop production from which they adapt and innovate to improve production systems. The PFR program is the natural evolution of this process, and its research data is now something we as Missouri farmers can access and deploy in our corn, soybean, and wheat production systems.

Comments (0) Number of views (4106)

20

Oct

2015

N. Indiana & Michigan - Denny Cobb, CPAG

Restoring Soil Health After Harvest

Author: Denny Cobb

As harvest progresses, you will see yield variabilities that are unparalleled. For many farmers, this will be a first time experience! You will see hybrids and varieties respond with wide yield swings. Just about any stress you can think of has shown up in our region this growing season. Rainfall intensity and frequent occurrences, planting delays, nitrogen losses, and compaction are the big four. Any one, or a combination of these, will hinder product performance this year.

Comments (0) Number of views (3862)

20

Oct

2015

Ohio - Alex Johnson, CCA

Make Product Evaluations at Harvest

Author: Alex Johnson

Harvest is in full swing and now is the time for product evaluations. Many farmers I know do not walk their fields at length to evaluate corn and soybean variety performance on their farm during the summer, but during harvest, you’ve got the best seat in the house — right behind the header. Use this opportunity to jot some notes down as you go from field to field and variety to variety.

Comments (0) Number of views (3666)

20

Sep

2015

Ohio - Alex Johnson, CCA

Thoughts Prior to Harvest

Author: Alex Johnson

One tendency among farmers with rotor combines is to run the rotor too slow. This grinds material more, moves material slower, and produces more fines to clean out. If the concave is too far open or closed, it can break grain. Book settings will normally get you pretty close when setting your combine.

Comments (0) Number of views (3651)

20

Sep

2015

S. Indiana - Steve Gauck, CCA

Good Planting Seasons Start with Harvest

Author: Steve Gauck

This is our one last chance to scout fields and evaluate the year before harvest begins. As you walk corn fields, be sure to evaluate disease levels and look to see which hybrids handled diseases better. Ask yourself if you are happy with your fungicide applications. Look at grain fill and pollination. Take a final assessment of weed control, record notes on what weeds are present and if they need to be targeted next year. In soybeans, be on the lookout for Palmer amaranth. It has been identified in southern Indiana and we do not want to run the combine through a patch of it and spread the seeds out.

Comments (0) Number of views (3887)

20

Sep

2015

NW Illinois & Iowa - Craig Kilby, CCA

Scouting Fields And Residue Management

Author: Craig Kilby

Before harvest begins, take this last opportunity to scout fields and evaluate the crop in corn fields, pay close attention to the disease levels and note hybrids which handled disease better. Are you happy with your fungicide decisions and applications? Make a final assessment of weed control, noting which weeds are present and if they need to be targeted next year. In soybeans, check for insect and disease pressure and be on the lookout for Palmer amaranth. It has been identified in many areas of northwest Illinois and you don’t want to run your combine through a patch of it when each plant may contain one million seeds. If you suspect a new weed in your fields this fall, call your Becks dealer or agronomist to identify it.

Comments (0) Number of views (3726)

20

Sep

2015

E. Indiana & W. Ohio - Brent Minett, CCA

How Are We Going To Handle This Year's Crop?

Author: Brent Minett

The 2015 growing season has been one most of us would rather forget. Cool and wet followed by warm and wet followed by dry in a few isolated areas. Nitrogen loss and leaf disease have added to the problem as summer has progressed. As harvest approaches, we need to consider how we are going to handle this crop. Here are a few thoughts:

Comments (0) Number of views (3515)

20

Sep

2015

Missouri - David Hughes, CCA

Soil Testing Game Plan

Author: David Hughes

As combines roll during harvest, be ready with a soil testing game-plan. Optimum crop nutrition requires an accurate inventory of the critical nutrients in your soil. Prioritize fields to include: newly acquired fields; fields that have not been soil tested within the past three years, and fields with observed nutrient deficiencies.

Comments (0) Number of views (4077)

20

Sep

2015

N. Indiana & Michigan - Denny Cobb, CPAG

Helping Cure Compaction and Stagnant Soils with Cover Crops

Author: Denny Cobb

This early fall period gives farmers the opportunity to implement management practices that will benefit them during the 2016 crop season and beyond. Our agronomic area experienced extraordinary rainfall events this past season. The intensive rain events of 2015 have created surface compaction as well as stagnant soils with limited amounts of oxygen and micro life. Cover crops are an excellent means to help cure these issues.

Comments (0) Number of views (3548)

20

Aug

2015

S. Indiana - Steve Gauck, CCA

Evaluating Corn and Soybean Crops

Author: Steve Gauck

What a year it has been. As we evaluate our crop in August, we have a great opportunity to take a hard look at yield potential and yield loss suffered this year. As you walk corn fields, pull ears and check for pollination problems. If you see some, think back to pollination time. Was it dry, wet, hot or cold? We lost a lot of nitrogen early. Are ears stunted?

Comments (0) Number of views (4385)

20

Aug

2015

Missouri - David Hughes, CCA

Harvest Is A Key Time To Learn

Author: David Hughes

Every year at this time I still feel that back-to-school excitement when I watch my children get ready to make the transition from the fun summer break back to more disciplined learning. As farmers, harvest is one of our key times to learn. Today’s technology enables us to gather valuable data at the same time we harvest the yield from a long season’s work. If you use a yield monitor, prepare for accurate yield data collection by going through your technology supplier’s preharvest maintenance checklist.

Comments (0) Number of views (3523)

20

Aug

2015

E. Indiana & W. Ohio - Brent Minett, CCA

Scouting Tips To Add Bushels

Author: Brent Minett

It has been a challenging growing season and although you might feel like giving up, don’t! Here are few scouting tips that could add a few bushels to this year’s crop.

Comments (0) Number of views (3448)
RSS
123

Connect with us

        


Follow us on Pinterest Follow us on Pinterest