Agronomy Talk

1

Apr

2020

Agronomy Talk: Frogeye Leaf Spot

Frogeye leaf spot (FLS), caused by the pathogen Cercospora sojina, is a common soybean foliar disease of many soybean-producing regions worldwide. In the U.S., the disease is established in southern production regions and has recently become prevalent in the Midwest and Upper Midwest. It’s believed that the range expansion and increased disease severity are caused by widespread planting of susceptible varieties, warmer winter temperatures, and the increased adoption of conservation tillage practices, which, together, lead to increased inoculum levels. FLS does not always cause yield loss, but yield loss of up to 60% has been reported with severe infection rates.

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8

Oct

2019

Agronomy Talk: Soybean Gall Midge

Author: Pat Holloway

Soybean gall midge is a new pest in soybeans, first documented in Nebraska in 2011 and South Dakota in 2015. In 2018, damage was documented in 66 counties in four states (Nebraska, Iowa, South Dakota, and Minnesota) with that number increasing by 19 additional counties so far in 2019 including the northwest corner of Missouri. It was not until the fall of 2018 that the species was identified.

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21

Aug

2019

Agronomy Talk: LATE-SEASON SOYBEAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

The initiation of flowering on a soybean means that the plant is transitioning into the reproductive growth stage. Most full-season soybeans enter reproductive growth approximately 45 to 55 days after planting. Double crop soybeans will typically enter reproductive growth approximately 34 to 38 days after planting. During this time, the plant has the ability to compensate for any plant injury or adverse growing conditions. Soybeans are prolific flower producers, although more than half are typically aborted prior to pod development.

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24

Jul

2019

Agronomy Update: IRON DEFICIENCY CHLORSIS (IDC)

Author: Mike Blaine

Iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC) is a physiological disorder caused by a lack of iron in the soybean plant which creates the “chlorosis” symptoms. Plants with IDC have yellowing (chlorosis) beginning between the veins and progressing to a generally chlorotic canopy. Other symptoms include reduced plant growth and ultimately, lower yields. Yield reductions from IDC are a primary limitation for some farmers in certain fields.

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11

Jul

2019

Agronomy Talk: Sudden Death Syndrome

Author: Mike Blaine

Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS), caused by Fusarium virguliforme, is a soybean disease that has grown in importance for farmers over the past 20 years. Today, it is ranked second only to soybean cyst nematode (SCN) as the most detrimental cause of annual damage to soybean yields. As the soybean-growing region has expanded to the North and the West, SDS continues to spread to new fields and to larger areas of fields that have already been infected. The severity of SDS damage varies from area to area and field to field, but yield reductions associated with SDS typically range anywhere from 20 to 70%.

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28

Jun

2019

Agronomy Talk: White Mold in Soybeans

Author: Eric Wilson

White Mold (a.k.a. sclerotinia stem rot) is a disease caused by the pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and if present, can devastate soybean yield. Farmers are often faced with making management decisions that leave them choosing between what is best for disease management and what is best for maximum yield potential.

Comments (0) Number of views (1958)

8

May

2019

Agronomy Talk: EARLY-SEASON FLOODING

Author: Steve Gauck

During rainy springs, fields may flood or even stay saturated for long periods of time. Flooded fields have two forms: saturated or waterlogged (where only the roots are flooded) or submerged (where the entire plant is under water). Saturated or waterlogged soils are more common than completely submerged plants, but they can both be damaging to yield.

Comments (0) Number of views (1865)

17

Apr

2019

Agronomy Talk: EARLY SOYBEAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Author: Denny Cobb

A soybean seed has two distinct parts: the cotyledons and the embryo. The two cotyledons are the main food storage structure, which supply food during emergence and for the seven to ten days after emergence through the V1 growth stage.

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1

Mar

2019

Agronomy Talk: Early-Season Frost Damage

Author: Mike Blaine

Early-season frost damage is a stressful physiological event that can slow plant development. The net impact of early-season frost will depend on the health of the plant before the frost, the extent and duration of the freezing temperatures, and the growing environment following the frost.

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16

Jan

2019

Agronomy Talk: Early-Season Compaction and Soybeans

Soil surface compaction can affect soybean plant height, root growth and development, pod set, and yield

Author: David Hughes

Soil surface compaction can affect soybean plant height, root growth and development, pod set, and yield

Comments (0) Number of views (2128)

25

Jun

2018

Agronomy Update: Tissue Testing in Corn and Soybeans

Author: Eric Wilson

Do you know how, when, and where should you tissue test? Do you know how to handle your samples once you pull them? What should you be thinking about when evaluating the results? 
 

Comments (0) Number of views (8043)

8

Jun

2018

Agronomy Update: Soybean Herbicide Damage

Author: Chad Kalaher

Do you know what herbicide damage in soybeans looks like? Over the past week, I have responded to a number of calls from farmers whose soybeans were showing symptoms of damage from metribuzin herbicide.
 

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21

May

2018

Agronomy Update: Soybean Emergence & ILeVO Effects

Author: Steve Gauck

Planters have continued to roll across fields in the Midwest over the last few weeks and soybeans have finally started to emerge. Now is a great time to evaluate your stands and see if there are any issues that need to be addressed.
 

Comments (0) Number of views (7009)

16

Feb

2017

Agronomy Update

Managing Continuous Soybeans

Over the past few seasons, soybean yields as a whole have been pretty impressive. As a strategy to combat lower grain prices, many farmers are taking a closer look at soybean after soybean, or even continuous soybean, rotations. This is especially true for farmers with acres that may not always be best suited to grow corn. Some things to think about when considering a soybean after soybean scenario are fertility, disease management, planting rate, and weed control. 

Comments (0) Number of views (8346)

18

Nov

2016

Agronomy Update

XtendiMax™ is Now Labeled for Use...

Author: Luke Schulte

By now many of you are probably aware that the EPA has approved the use of the herbicide XtendiMax™ with VaporGrip™ technology for in-crop use in dicamba tolerant soybeans. The Roundup Ready 2 Xtend® soybeans will have tolerance to both glyphosate as well as dicamba. Currently, the XtendiMax label only has a two-year registration. The EPA has reserved the right to rescind the label if they feel the product is being misused, is having a negative impact on the environment and general public impact, or is having a high number of off-target incidents.

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28

Sep

2016

Agronomy Update

Soybeans Not Fit to Harvest?

Author: Luke Schulte

“Harvest time is here but my soybeans won’t get fit to harvest!”

A very common, yet intriguing question many farmers have had this fall. I’ve heard numerous remarks such as “my 3.5 maturity soybeans will be ready before my 2.9 soybeans and I planted them at the same time!” So why are soybeans maturing inconsistently? 

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17

May

2016

Agronomy Update

Ohio Fields Showing Signs of Frost Damage

Author: Alex Johnson

The cool temperatures we have experienced over the last several nights have led to questions regarding frost damage. We are seeing some signs of frost damage here at our Ohio Practical Farm Research (PFR)® location, however we won’t know the severity of this damage until three to five days following the frost event. With the low temperatures leading up to this recent frost event, the hardening off process had started making our crops more tolerant of cool temperatures. Wet soils and dew present helps to maintain soil temperatures, thereby decreasing the risk of injury.

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20

Oct

2015

NW Illinois & Iowa - Craig Kilby, CCA

Fall Fertility Decisions

Author: Craig Kilby

Fall fertility decisions in northwest Illinois have traditionally been based on crop removal and recent soil test levels. That may remain unchanged for some in 2015, while others may find the need to adjust levels lower due to economics. The cost to apply major nutrients like P and K have not dropped at the same rate as grain prices, resulting in heightened interest of economical use of these nutrients. Referring to soil test information, P and K can be allocated to only those areas most likely to respond to applications. Be sure to review critical levels of nutrients for corn, soybean, wheat, and alfalfa. The probability and magnitude of return to P and K fertilizer will increase when applied to soil test levels below the critical level.

Comments (0) Number of views (5651)

20

Oct

2015

S. Indiana - Steve Gauck, CCA

Evaluate Fungicide Applications During Harvest

Author: Steve Gauck

This year can be called the year of leaf diseases! We have seen gray leaf spot, northern corn leaf blight, and even southern rust. Corn has filled out well, but stalk quality is a concern as plants have cannibalized with the late dry stress. Harvest will be a chance for us to evaluate our fungicide applications. Many diseases came in late and the residual from the fungicide may be gone. In some cases, these diseases may not have affected yield dramatically. If you are planning to go corn after corn, consider what diseases you had and plant a hybrid with good tolerance to them.

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20

Oct

2015

Ohio - Alex Johnson, CCA

Make Product Evaluations at Harvest

Author: Alex Johnson

Harvest is in full swing and now is the time for product evaluations. Many farmers I know do not walk their fields at length to evaluate corn and soybean variety performance on their farm during the summer, but during harvest, you’ve got the best seat in the house — right behind the header. Use this opportunity to jot some notes down as you go from field to field and variety to variety.

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