Agronomy Talk

10

Feb

2017

Agronomy Update

Wheat Updates Continued...

Author: David Hughes

Kansas State Plant Pathologist Erick De DeWolf has put out, in my opinion, the most accurate winter wheat fungicide efficacy ratings. You can review it here. In it, he summarizes performance ratings and also provides insight we can utilize as we make plans for fungicide applications on our wheat this year.

In addition to these ratings, I wanted to share with you a few thoughts I had looking back on the 2016 season.

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8

Feb

2017

Agronomy Update

2017 Wheat Outlook

Author: Steve Gauck

We have been experiencing warmer than usual temperatures this winter in Southern Indiana. In terms of wheat, this warm weather has not concerned me as it is what happens in early spring that affects yield the most. The two factors that have the biggest impact on our quest to achieving high-yielding wheat are scouting and nitrogen (N) management. As you begin to evaluate your wheat stand, one of the most important things to remember is to perform stand checks. This can be done with a 1 x 1 ft. square, as shown below. Be sure to take counts at multiple locations that represent different landscape positions in your fields.

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6

Feb

2017

Agronomy Update

Cover Crops: Termination Timing and Weed Suppression

Author: Austin Scott

Cover crop acres have been steadily on the rise for the last few years. According to a recent survey by the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Department, farmers in the U.S. increased their cover crop acres by 147 percent from 2014 to 2016. But, this rapid adoption did not come without growing pains. Many farmers have struggled with terminating their cover crops on time and, in many cases, the cover crop persisted into the growing season and actually became detrimental to yield. 

Cover crop acres have been steadily on the rise for the last few years. According to a recent survey by the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Department, farmers in the U.S. increased their cover crop acres by 147 percent from 2014 to 2016. But, this rapid adoption did not arise without growing pains. Many farmers have struggled with terminating their cover crops on time and, in many cases, the cover crop persisted into the growing season and actually became detrimental to yield. How and when you should kill your cover crop will be dependent on the cash crop you’re planting as well as the species and growth stage of your cover crop.

Many farmers are using cereal crops (cereal rye, wheat, etc.) as a part of their mixture because of their relatively low cost and ability to produce biomass above and below ground. Soybeans have a greater ability to overcome cereal competition early in the year so termination can be delayed up to 7 to 14 days after planting. Corn lacks the early season “grit” that soybeans have and thus, the cereal cover should be terminated at least 14 days ahead of planting. University of Tennessee Weed Scientists Dr. Garret Montgomery and Dr. Larry Steckel have seen a negative impact on corn stands and early season vigor when a standalone cereal cover crop was used. However, when a legume (vetch) was introduced to the mix, a significant difference in vigor was seen (Figure 1).
 

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3

Feb

2017

Agronomy Update

2017 Wheat Updates

Author: David Hughes

I’ve recently had the opportunity to scout a few wheat fields and I wanted to share with you a few updates. 

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3

Feb

2017

Agronomy Update

Wheat Updates and Nitrogen Managment

I’ve received a few calls over the past few weeks from wheat farmers inquiring whether or not their wheat fields were starting to break dormancy. From what I’ve seen, the answer is yes. Many wheat fields have in fact “greened up” over the last couple of weeks. With temperatures reaching the mid-60s on January 21 and 22, and nighttime temperatures remaining above freezing until around January 26, a definite change has taken place across southern Illinois wheat fields.

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9

Jan

2017

Agronomy Update

Weed Control Reminders

Author: David Hughes

Happy New Year from your Beck’s Missouri agronomy team! Alex, Clint, Norm, Matt and I look forward to the opportunity to help you succeed in 2017. With timely information, research, field diagnosis and experience, our goal is to help you make this year the most profitable it can be. Growing row crops in a low market environment can be challenging and requires us to sharpen and apply our management skills.  

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2

Jan

2017

Agronomy Update

Soil Tests 101: How to Read Your Results

Author: Austin Scott

One of the staples for growing healthy, high-yielding crops is to maintain good soil fertility. That’s why most agronomists will suggest soil sampling every two to three years to evaluate how your fields are holding up. These tests however are not always the easiest to read and many farmers often need help interpreting the results. Here are some key tips and areas to focus on when evaluating your soil test report. 

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18

Nov

2016

Agronomy Update

XtendiMax™ is Now Labeled for Use...

Author: Luke Schulte

By now many of you are probably aware that the EPA has approved the use of the herbicide XtendiMax™ with VaporGrip™ technology for in-crop use in dicamba tolerant soybeans. The Roundup Ready 2 Xtend® soybeans will have tolerance to both glyphosate as well as dicamba. Currently, the XtendiMax label only has a two-year registration. The EPA has reserved the right to rescind the label if they feel the product is being misused, is having a negative impact on the environment and general public impact, or is having a high number of off-target incidents.

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7

Nov

2016

Agronomy Update

Dust It In, Bust the Bin!

Author: Austin Scott

Even though wheat acres are down quite a bit this year, I’ve seen a lot of drills running through fields over the past month. I’ve also heard the old adage, “dust it in, bust the bin” more times than I can count. While it was ok at first, it’s now starting to worry me. 

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24

Oct

2016

Agronomy Update

It’s Never Too Early to Plan for Next Year…

Author: Luke Schulte

For many of us, fall is about seeing the “payoff” from all our hard work during the past season. While harvest does allow us to make observations and summarize our findings from the past season, I’d encourage you to also consider preparing your seed bed for next year. For some of you that means tillage, for others who do not intend to till their acres, this means controlling those fall emerged weeds.  

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19

Oct

2016

OHIO - MIKE HANNEWALD, CCA

Evaluating Your Combines Performance

Author: Alex Johnson

As harvest progresses in Ohio, we are finding out which fields received enough water and which did not. As you navigate these varying conditions, it’s important to continue evaluating your combine’s performance. We usually do a good job of setting the combine when we start harvest; but don’t forget to continually monitor threshing quality and crop losses. 

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19

Oct

2016

KENTUCKY AND TENNESSEE - AUSTIN SCOTT, CCA

Ear Rot at Harvest

Author: Austin Scott

I’ve noticed a fair amount of ear rot this year, in particular, Diplodia. Diplodia can be exceptionally bad because the disease will eventually mummify the entire ear and can cause the kernels to be very lightweight.

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19

Oct

2016

E. INDIANA AND MICHIGAN - BRENT MINETT, CCA

Considerations Before Fall-Tilling

Author: Brent Minett

Although fall tillage is a common practice across much of the Corn Belt, there are scenarios that favor the practice and others that do not. Many times following harvest, we begin plowing without considering amultitude of factors that might limit the benefits we should experience from making that decision. 

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19

Oct

2016

N. INDIANA - DENNY COBB, CPAG

Facing Late Season Challenges

Author: Denny Cobb

For many farmers in my region, the 2016 harvest is a welcome change compared to 2015. Challenges always exist in any given year, but thankfully they were minimal and less severe this year than in 2015.

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19

Oct

2016

S. INDIANA - STEVE GAUCK, CCA

Evaluating Fungicide Plans and Disease Pressure

Author: Steve Gauck

Diseases have become a major topic this fall. We have seen gray leaf spot, Anthracnose stalk rot, Diplopia stalk and ear rot, and even southern rust. Corn has filled out well, but stalk quality has become a concern as plants have cannibalized with late stress.

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19

Oct

2016

NE ILLINOIS, NW INDIANA, SE WISCONSIN - CHAD KALAHER, CCA

Fall Field Work is Underway

Author: Chad Kalaher

With harvest completion just around the corner, fall field work including fertilizer applications and tillage operations will be top priority. If you are applying dry fertilizer this fall, now is the best time to utilize yield maps for VRT applications based on crop removal. 

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19

Oct

2016

W. CENTRAL ILLINOIS - CRAIG KILBY, CCA

2016: What Worked and What Didn't

Author: Craig Kilby

When the 2016 harvest is behind us, it will be critical to review product performance and integral management practices. This is the time to learn what worked well, what didn’t work, and why. Although each season is unique, trends can indicate a strong relationship which demands attention. 

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19

Oct

2016

N ILLINOIS AND S. WISCONSIN - JON SKINNER, CCA

Residue Management For High-Yielding Fields

Author: Jon Skinner

For most farmers in Wisconsin and northern Illinois, the spring planting season seems like a long distant look into the future, but prepping for that time should start from the seat of the combine. With increases in yield, plant population and stalk quality, residue management has become one of the most important aspects of farming.

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19

Oct

2016

S. ILLINOIS - SEAN NETTLETON, CCA

Using 2016 Data for 2017 Planning

Harvest is in full swing in southern Illinois! As you go from farm to farm, take the opportunity to write down your observations of hybrids and varieties, drainage concerns, or anything else you see that may help you in future decision making. 

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19

Oct

2016

MISSOURI - DAVID HUGHES, CCA

Developing Your Fertilizer Recommendation

Author: David Hughes

While fertilizer is a key input, many farmers are faced with low grain prices and margins. Though many crop advisors belabor the merits of different soil testing approaches, rarely do they consider accurate fertilizer recommendations that fit specific production and economic scenarios.

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