Agronomy Talk

1

May

2014

Agronomy Update

NE Illinois and NW Indiana: Predicting Corn Emergence and Soybean Inoculants

Author: Chad Kalaher

CORN PLANTING PROGRESS – Predicting Emergence
During April 10-12 corn planting was slow in isolated areas primarily near Springfield, IL followed by a cool, wet period. Planting resumed again April 17 in a general triangle that was formed by areas around Springfield, Bloomington and Champaign.

SOYBEAN INOCULANT
Part of the soybean high-yield equation includes the use of premium seed treatments. While Beck’s Escalate yield enhancement system is an industry-leading seed treatment combination of fungicides, insecticides, and growth promoter, Optimize® liquid inoculant was also offered on many varieties this year with the nematode control products VOTiVO® or Clariva™.

SOYBEAN SEEDING RATE
The proper soybean seeding rate has been a topic of discussion with growers, agronomists and university personnel for decades. Although final, consistent and uniform stands of 100,000-125,000 soybean plants/acre has generally been accepted to maximize economic return, many factors can influence the optimum seeding rate.

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29

Apr

2014

Agronomy Update

E. Indiana and Ohio: Nitrogen Loss and Wheat Update

Author: Mark Apelt

How much nitrogen are you losing?
Every year there are questions regarding nitrogen (N) loss from spring storms. This will cause some N loss, but exactly how much is not known. We can take an educated guess by understanding how N reacts in the soil.

Wheat Update
According to NASS, approximately 24% of Ohio and 43% of Indiana’s wheat is jointing. The further north you go, the more behind it is and therefore not jointing yet.

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22

Apr

2014

Agronomy Update

E. Indiana and Ohio: Planting Time and Depth

Author: Mark Apelt

Should I Be Planting Yet?
The calendar says we should be planting, the soil moisture level in many areas says we should be planting, but the forecast calls for cool weather into next week.

How Deep Should I Plant Corn?
As mentioned in the previous article, the weather is predicted to stay below normal for the next week. If you decide to plant, should you plant shallower due to the colder weather?

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17

Apr

2014

Agronomy Update

NE Illinois & NW Indiana: Zinc, Tissue Sampling, and Wheat Progress

Author: Chad Kalaher

ADD ZINC TO YOUR STARTER FERTILIZER PROGRAM
One of the common questions I have been getting lately is definitely not a new one. “Should I be using liquid starter fertilizer at planting for corn?” While some farmers in the Midwest have been using starter for many years, others are just getting started.

TISSUE SAMPLING FOR HIGHER YIELDS
Have you mastered the “Seven Wonders of the Corn Yield World” and “The Six Secrets of Soybean Success?” Most likely, your answer is “No, but I give it my best shot to control what I can!” Although Dr. Fred Below’s recipes do not include foliar nutrition, plants lacking optimum levels of macro and/or micronutrients usually fail to produce high yields.

WHEAT CROP STATUS UPDATE
The wheat crop in our area has gone through one of the coldest winters on record. Growth stage currently ranges from Feekes 2- Feekes 4. Using October 12 as a planting date, we are 321 wheat growing degree days (GDDs) behind the previous year through April 12. If we have average temperatures in the last half of April, this will correlate to a two week delay. Given that some fields didn’t get planted until the last week of October, we are closer to a delay of 3-4 weeks.

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16

Apr

2014

Agronomy Update

E. Indiana and Ohio: Anhydrous Ammonia Application, Seed Spacing, and Terminating Cover Crops

Author: Mark Apelt

How long do I wait between applying anhydrous ammonia and planting?
Based on how the 2014 season is shaping up so far, we will be doing many field activities all at once. One question on many farmers mind is “How long do I need to wait between applying anhydrous (NH3) and planting?”

Uniform Seed Spacing for Maximum Yield-- How important is uniform seed spacing?
According to research from Purdue University-very important! Purdue looked at plant to plant spacing over a 6 year period and measured yield loss. They measured the plant to plant distance over a 30 foot area in 2-3 areas of a field.

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