Agronomy Talk

10

Jun

2016

Agronomy Update

Yellowed Corn in Ohio Fields

Author: Alex Knight

A common service call I have received over the past week is yellowed corn. What causes yellow corn? Should you be concerned? What is important to remember is that the type of yellowing you see on your corn will be indicative of what caused the yellowing.

Comments (0) Number of views (5560)

8

Jun

2016

Agronomy Update

Ohio Field Observations: Fertilizer Burn

Author: Mark Apelt

A large percentage of Ohio’s corn acres were put in the ground over the last few weeks. Since then, the warm temperatures have caused corn to emerge rather quickly, in approximately five days vs. the April planted corn which, in some cases, took up to three weeks! As our customers are out scouting their fields, several of them have noticed a reduced stand and wondering what the causes might have been...

Comments (0) Number of views (5848)

7

Jun

2016

Agronomy Update

Corn Syndromes…Do They Really Cost You Anything?

Author: Austin Scott

As the southernmost agronomist for Beck’s, I’m usually the first one to see which pest(s) will be the worst, and this year is no exception. Although I haven’t seen much disease or insect pressure (up to this point), I have received numerous calls about yellow tops, white spots, or purpling in corn. With that, I thought this would be a perfect opportunity to explain some of these “corn syndromes.” 

Comments (0) Number of views (13860)

26

May

2016

N. Indiana - Denny Cobb, CPAg

A Plant's First 30 Days

Author: Denny Cobb

Plants need conducive growing conditions all season long for optimal performance. No other period of life is more important than a plant’s first 30 days. That period from seed to a true functioning plant with an active root system needs to be as stress free as possible. What we do or don’t do prior to planting sets the tone for this early growth period.

Comments (0) Number of views (2040)
Read more

Categories: Agronomy Talk

Tags:

26

May

2016

E. Indiana and Michigan - Brent Minett, CCA

Nitrogen Stabilizers

Author: Brent Minett

Many of you will be sidedressing corn in the coming weeks. Nitrogen represents a significant part of the investment needed to grow a corn crop, so we want to maximize yield while being efficient in the process. Nitrogen stabilizers are one way to accomplish this goal.

Comments (0) Number of views (1959)
Read more

Categories: Agronomy Talk

Tags:

26

May

2016

W. Iowa - Pat Holloway, CCA

Early Season Stressors

Author: Pat Holloway

Early season growing conditions can be conducive to disease development. This is especially true as corn and soybean planting dates move earlier in the growing season to maximize yields. Early season stresses caused by cool, water-logged soils can lead to increased incidence of diseases.

Comments (0) Number of views (2374)
Read more

Categories: Agronomy Talk

Tags:

26

May

2016

S. Indiana - Steve Gauck, CCA

Look at Corn and Soybeans, But Don't Forget About Wheat

Author: Steve Gauck

Wheat can become the forgotten crop this time of year. We had an unusual winter, but overall wheat looks good. As you scout your fields, keep an eye on leaf diseases and any weeds that may have escaped. If you only scout wheat once, make sure to pay close attention at flowering and if we have wet weather, make sure to apply a fungicide for head scab! As corn and soybeans start to emerge, take time to evaluate what is happening with your crop.

Comments (0) Number of views (1931)
Read more

Categories: Agronomy Talk

Tags:

26

May

2016

Missouri - David Hughes, CCA

Poultry Manure Applications

Author: David Hughes

One thing I recommend to many farmers in Missouri is to apply poultry manure. It provides increased soil health, organic matter, and adds a good supply of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K). The average per-ton, N-P-K analysis I have taken in the past 8 to 10 years runs approximately 16-45-40 with 16 lb. N being the estimated first-year available. This means a 2 ton/A. application equates to applying approximately 32-90-80 ahead of a corn or soybean crop in addition to the organic material. Often, farmers want to apply manure on soybean stubble going to corn for the extra N benefit.

Comments (0) Number of views (2090)
Read more

Categories: Agronomy Talk

Tags:

26

May

2016

NE Illinois, NW Indiana, SE Wisconsin - Chad Kalaher, CCA

Early Season Crop Evaluations

Author: Chad Kalaher

May is usually an optimum time to scout fields for early-season crop protection and management needs. Make sure to evaluate stands, weed control performance of pre-plant and pre-emerge herbicides, and the potential need for a timely post-emerge application. In corn, review post herbicide labels prior to application for any potential use restrictions with soil-applied insecticides. If a significant amount of rain has occurred since nitrogen (N) was applied, evaluating soil nitrate levels may help fine-tune your sidedress application rate.

Comments (0) Number of views (1939)
Read more

Categories: Agronomy Talk

Tags:

26

May

2016

NW Illinois - Craig Kilby, CCA

Indentify Yield-Limiting Issues Now Instead of Harvest

Author: Craig Kilby

Greetings! May is generally the ideal time to assess corn plants at the V2 to V8 growth stages to provide the best opportunity for top yield. Diagnosing any issues that could limit yield are much easier to identify today than at harvest. Therefore, scout each field to score and record populations, plant health, roots,soil conditions, weed control, and the crop’s nutritional needs.

Comments (0) Number of views (2075)
Read more

Categories: Agronomy Talk

Tags:

26

May

2016

Ohio - Alex Johnson, CCA

Late Planted Corn

Author: Alex Johnson

History shows us that early planted crops yield more than late planted 8 out of every 10 years. But since we know the weather doesn’t always work out in our favor, let’s look at what could be in store if fields end up getting planted late. Here’s the positive: late planted corn does compensate somewhat. Our XL 5828™*brand (110-day) hybrid takes 2,650 growing degree days (GDD) to physiologically mature to the black layer growth stage. For every day that planting is delayed beyond May 1, that corn will compensate 6.8 GDDs.

Comments (0) Number of views (1782)
Read more

Categories: Agronomy Talk

Tags:

26

May

2016

Central Iowa - Wade Kent, CCA

Early Season Scouting and Crop Management

Author: Wade Kent

Early season scouting and crop management are critical to maintaining and maximizing grain yield at the end of the season. It can help identify potential yield limiting factors and allow for corrective action to be taken. Weed management is another critical component. Regardless of your herbicide program, now is the time to begin scouting for early season weeds.

Comments (0) Number of views (2100)
Read more

Categories: Agronomy Talk

Tags:

26

May

2016

Kentucky and Tennessee - Austin Scott, CCA

Have a Plan Before You Have a Problem

Author: Austin Scott

I’m sure everybody is just as excited that the 2016 planting season is under way! Hopefully by now, most of your corn is planted and you’ve already started planting soybeans. Choosing the correct herbicide program is paramount in protecting yield, and these programs can change drastically based on the weeds you’re targeting. Be sure to have a plan before you have a problem!

Comments (0) Number of views (1909)
Read more

Categories: Agronomy Talk

Tags:

26

May

2016

S. Illinois - Sean Nettleton, CCA

Value of Tissue Sampling

While the 2016 crop continues to take shape, I wanted to take a minute to talk about the value of tissue sampling in the pursuit of high yielding crops. Whether you want to take a snap shot of your current fertility program,or you are trying to find your crop’s hidden hunger, collecting tissue samples throughout the season can be a rewarding experience. Tissue sampling gives you a chance to see if fertilizer rates or placement are providing adequate nutrients to the growing crop. Think of this like you or I going to the doctor for a checkup!

Comments (0) Number of views (1971)
Read more

Categories: Agronomy Talk

Tags:

23

May

2016

Agronomy Update

Dealing with Delayed Planting or Replant?

Author: Chad Kalaher

In some areas, the window of opportunity for planting corn, and environmental conditions that followed, were not ideal for rapid germination and emergence. The cold soils and excessive rainfall we experienced shortly after planting has led to uneven emergence, delayed emergence, and an onset of seedling blights. We have also seen the use of rotary hoes in some areas with crusted soils. 

Comments (0) Number of views (7268)

19

May

2016

Agronomy Update

Missouri Soybean Fields Showing Signs of PPO-Herbicide Injury

Author: David Hughes

Over the past week I have been called to numerous fields to evaluate emerging soybeans that are weak, injured by feeding or herbicides, or were impacted by seedling disease, primarily Pythium (root rot/damping off). I wanted to take a minute to discuss PPO-herbicide injury.

Comments (0) Number of views (5910)

17

May

2016

Agronomy Update

Ohio Fields Showing Signs of Frost Damage

Author: Alex Johnson

The cool temperatures we have experienced over the last several nights have led to questions regarding frost damage. We are seeing some signs of frost damage here at our Ohio Practical Farm Research (PFR)® location, however we won’t know the severity of this damage until three to five days following the frost event. With the low temperatures leading up to this recent frost event, the hardening off process had started making our crops more tolerant of cool temperatures. Wet soils and dew present helps to maintain soil temperatures, thereby decreasing the risk of injury.

Comments (0) Number of views (7478)

13

May

2016

Agronomy Update

Corn Emergence and GDUs

Given the cool, wet conditions we have been experiencing, I wanted to take the opportunity to send a timely update. Now is a great time to evaluate fields we have already planted. Chances are, some of your fields are up while others are taking a bit longer.

Comments (0) Number of views (5680)

12

May

2016

Agronomy Update

Wheat Threats Due to Cold Weather in Ohio

Author: Mark Apelt

The cool, wet weather we have been experiencing has lead to increased concern for various threats to our wheat crops. This article includes my updates on what I have been seeing in wheat fields across Ohio over the past few days.

Comments (0) Number of views (6075)

10

May

2016

Agronomy Update

What to Scout for in May

Author: David Hughes

May can be a busy month. Most of us are planting soybeans, post-spraying corn, spraying burndown ahead of beans, and/or checking on maturing wheat. We have a lot happening all at the same time.

With that in mind, I thought I’d share some of the things I keep an eye on and field scout for during this busy month. My intent with this article is not to give you a “how-to” for each of these, but rather to let you know what you should be looking for and thinking about from a crop diagnostic perspective.

Comments (0) Number of views (5620)
RSS
First567891011121314Last

Connect with us

        


Follow us on Pinterest Follow us on Pinterest