Agronomy Talk

25

Jul

2019

Agronomy Talk: Green Snap in Corn

Author: Pat Holloway

Green snap, also called brittle snap, is the breakage of a corn plant usually prior to tassel during the rapid growth period of corn from about the V5 (5 visible leaf collars) – R2 (silk).

Comments (0) Number of views (336)

24

Jul

2019

Agronomy Update: IRON DEFICIENCY CHLORSIS (IDC)

Author: Mike Blaine

Iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC) is a physiological disorder caused by a lack of iron in the soybean plant which creates the “chlorosis” symptoms. Plants with IDC have yellowing (chlorosis) beginning between the veins and progressing to a generally chlorotic canopy. Other symptoms include reduced plant growth and ultimately, lower yields. Yield reductions from IDC are a primary limitation for some farmers in certain fields.

Comments (0) Number of views (150)

24

Jul

2019

Agronomy Talk: Crown Rot

Author: Luke Schulte

Crown rot infections are caused by both fusarium and pythium species. These fungi enter the plant via the root system during periods of prolonged saturation, predominately between the V2 and V7 growth stage. Because these fungi persist in higher moisture environments, infections are more prevalent in wetter soils, tighter clay soil textures, higher magnesium soils, and ponded areas of fields. While these infections occur early in corn development, they can persist much longer as the visual signs are not easily detected until later in the grain fill period.

Comments (0) Number of views (187)

24

Jul

2019

Agronomy Talk: Tar Spot

Author: Jon Skinner

Tar Spot is a relatively new disease in the US but is one that can cause severe yield loss if conditions are right.

Comments (0) Number of views (148)

18

Jul

2019

Agronomy Talk: Foliar Corn Diseases

Corn foliar diseases can have similar symptoms. See below for a refresher on 6 of the most common foliar diseases in Beck's marketing area. For help with a specific situation, or to learn more about management options, reach out to your local Beck's representative.

Comments (0) Number of views (226)

11

Jul

2019

Agronomy Talk: Sudden Death Syndrome

Author: Mike Blaine

Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS), caused by Fusarium virguliforme, is a soybean disease that has grown in importance for farmers over the past 20 years. Today, it is ranked second only to soybean cyst nematode (SCN) as the most detrimental cause of annual damage to soybean yields. As the soybean-growing region has expanded to the North and the West, SDS continues to spread to new fields and to larger areas of fields that have already been infected. The severity of SDS damage varies from area to area and field to field, but yield reductions associated with SDS typically range anywhere from 20 to 70%.

Comments (0) Number of views (315)

28

Jun

2019

Agronomy Talk: White Mold in Soybeans

Author: Eric Wilson

White Mold (a.k.a. sclerotinia stem rot) is a disease caused by the pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and if present, can devastate soybean yield. Farmers are often faced with making management decisions that leave them choosing between what is best for disease management and what is best for maximum yield potential.

Comments (0) Number of views (412)

19

Jun

2019

Agronomy Talk: Late-Planted Corn

Author: Luke Schulte

Broad areas of the Corn Belt have experienced one of the most challenging planting season in recent memory. Farmers did what they do best, and bided their time for a planting window. Corn acres from South Dakota to Ohio were planted weeks later than what is typical. And while many farmers are already worn out from the extended planting season, most are more nervous about what’s to come.

The good news is that late planted acres still have great yield potential. If Mother Nature starts cooperating, this season has abundant hope of producing competitive yields.

Comments (0) Number of views (429)

18

Jun

2019

Agronomy Talk: Tissue Testing

Author: Ben Puestow

Tissue testing is an excellent tool for fine-tuning your nutrient management plans and helping to push yields to the next level. Tissue sampling should be done regularly to identify and track any deficiencies or imbalances, and it can also be used as a method for diagnosing problems within a field.

Comments (0) Number of views (402)

31

May

2019

Prevent Plant Decision Discussion

Author: Jim Schwartz

Most farmers can't remember a planting season that has been any more challenging than 2019.

Comments (0) Number of views (785)

28

May

2019

Agronomy Talk: Fallow Syndrome

Author: Jim Schwartz

For some farmers this year, their acres will likely not be planted in row crops and decisions will have to be made regarding how to manage them. Weed control will be a key management practice for those acres, however, simply killing the weeds and keeping the ground bare could lead to consequences in the following year due to a condition called fallow syndrome. 

Comments (0) Number of views (691)

28

May

2019

Agronomy Talk: Escalate® Performance in Warmer Soil Temperatures

What exactly does Beck’s Escalate® yield enhancement system protect your seed against? 

Think of our Escalate system as a toolbox. We don’t necessarily know what the weather will bring each spring, but we know we are equipped with a full toolbox that can help us combat whatever Mother Nature throws our way. 
 

Comments (0) Number of views (851)

24

May

2019

Agronomy Update: Black Cutworm Pressure

Author: Austin Scott

Take a walk with Field Agronomist and Herbicide Specialist, Austin Scott, through a Tennessee corn field and learn more about increased black cutworm pressure.
 

Comments (0) Number of views (797)

17

May

2019

Agronomy Talk: Seedling Disease

Author: Alex Long

Any disease requires three things to flourish: a viable host, suitable environmental conditions, and the presence of a pathogen. When we attempt to manage a disease, we must manage one of these three factors in order to be successful.

Comments (0) Number of views (635)

17

May

2019

Agronomy Talk: Terminating a Failed Corn Crop

Author: Austin Scott

There are many reasons a corn crop may fail. In some years it’s a late frost and in others, soil surface crusting. Regardless of the reason the stand fails, it is important to destroy the original crop before replanting. Yield losses can occur if just 5,000 of the original corn plants remain to compete with the new stand. Therefore, it is imperative to successfully eradicate as much of the existing stand as possible.

Comments (0) Number of views (664)

14

May

2019

Agronomy Talk: 10 Reasons Why You Should Stick To Your Planting Plan

Author: Luke Schulte

As the rain is delaying planting, many farmers are becoming concerned that their corn maturities are too long. In my opinion (based on facts), here are the Top 10 reasons why you should stick with your original plan.

Comments (0) Number of views (1112)

9

May

2019

Agronomy Talk: Weed Identification and Compaction Issues

Author: Austin Scott

Can you pick a palmer from a redroot? 

Weeds are off to the races this season and the first, and most important step to controlling broadleaf weeds is correct identification.

 

Comments (0) Number of views (943)

8

May

2019

Agronomy Talk: EARLY CORN DEVELOPMENT

Author: Steve Gauck

When a corn kernel is planted into warm, moist soil, water is absorbed through the seed coat and the kernel begins to swell. The critical soil moisture required for corn to germinate is 30%, and a corn seed will absorb 1.5 to 2 times its weight in water during the germination process.

 

Comments (0) Number of views (726)

8

May

2019

Agronomy Talk: EARLY-SEASON FLOODING

Author: Steve Gauck

During rainy springs, fields may flood or even stay saturated for long periods of time. Flooded fields have two forms: saturated or waterlogged (where only the roots are flooded) or submerged (where the entire plant is under water). Saturated or waterlogged soils are more common than completely submerged plants, but they can both be damaging to yield.

Comments (0) Number of views (817)

3

May

2019

Agronomy Talk: DELAYED PLANTING

Author: Eric Wilson

In delayed planting situations, there are some key concepts to consider when deciding to whether or not to continue as planned with corn, move to an earlier maturity hybrid, or switch to soybeans altogether.   

Comments (0) Number of views (1238)
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