Agronomy Talk

12

Apr

2017

Agronomy Update

Burndown Options, Planting Behind Anhydrous Ammonia and Black Cutworm

Author: Luke Schulte

As we prepare for planting, there are a number of things to keep in mind. From burndown to weed and pest control, there are factors to consider that will ultimately affect the season ahead.  

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6

Mar

2017

Agronomy Update

Early Burndown Options

Author: Austin Scott

God willing, planters will be rolling through fields within the next four to five weeks. If you haven’t already, now is the time to start thinking about burndown options. We’ve had a very mild winter (as you can tell by the size of our wheat!) and many winter annuals have grown much larger than usual. This should be taken into consideration when thinking about those hard-to-control winter weeds like Italian ryegrass and marestail. 

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24

Oct

2016

Agronomy Update

It’s Never Too Early to Plan for Next Year…

Author: Luke Schulte

For many of us, fall is about seeing the “payoff” from all our hard work during the past season. While harvest does allow us to make observations and summarize our findings from the past season, I’d encourage you to also consider preparing your seed bed for next year. For some of you that means tillage, for others who do not intend to till their acres, this means controlling those fall emerged weeds.  

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13

Oct

2016

Agronomy Update

Controlling Winter Annual Weeds

Author: David Hughes

The time spent in the combine is perfect for scouting winter annual weeds while monitoring your harvest operations. A winter annual weed is just like it sounds… an annual weed with a life cycle that begins in the fall and may go dormant during the winter before maturing and dying in the spring. With this type of life cycle, winter annual weeds were less of a concern in past years because they weren’t considered to be competitive with a growing summer crop, and conventional tillage practices took care of them before planting. 

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4

Jul

2014

Agronomy Update

E. Indiana and Ohio: Giant Ragweed and Marestail, Brittle Snap of Corn and Yellow Soybeans

Author: Mark Apelt

With all the rain we have received in certain areas there have been several farmers who have not had the opportunity to apply their post emerge herbicides. Many fields have giant ragweed and marestail escapes. Let’s talk about options for each.

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