Agronomy Talk

7

Jun

2017

AGRONOMY UPDATE

Purple Corn Syndrome

Author: Luke Schulte

It’s not uncommon for me this time of year to receive calls regarding corn plants turning purple. While it’s not unusual, it is important to understand the underlying cause and, more importantly, that in most cases this condition is temporary and cosmetic, and will not impact yield. 

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20

Oct

2015

E. Indiana & W. Ohio - Brent Minett, CCA

Stalk Quality and Harvest Prioritization

Author: Brent Minett

Stalk quality can be negatively affected by three factors: disease, nutrient deficiency, and environment. Fungal diseases like fusarium, anthracnose, and gibberella stalk rot cause decay of the internal pith tissues of the stalk. Nitrogen deficiency can lead to the ear cannibalizing the stalk to feed itself. Extended straight line winds in excess of 60 mph can cause any hybrid to lodge; especially those fields that have experienced stress from the other two factors. Harvest prioritization will be especially important this fall.

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20

Oct

2015

Ohio - Alex Johnson, CCA

Make Product Evaluations at Harvest

Author: Alex Johnson

Harvest is in full swing and now is the time for product evaluations. Many farmers I know do not walk their fields at length to evaluate corn and soybean variety performance on their farm during the summer, but during harvest, you’ve got the best seat in the house — right behind the header. Use this opportunity to jot some notes down as you go from field to field and variety to variety.

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20

Sep

2015

Ohio - Alex Johnson, CCA

Thoughts Prior to Harvest

Author: Alex Johnson

One tendency among farmers with rotor combines is to run the rotor too slow. This grinds material more, moves material slower, and produces more fines to clean out. If the concave is too far open or closed, it can break grain. Book settings will normally get you pretty close when setting your combine.

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20

Sep

2015

E. Indiana & W. Ohio - Brent Minett, CCA

How Are We Going To Handle This Year's Crop?

Author: Brent Minett

The 2015 growing season has been one most of us would rather forget. Cool and wet followed by warm and wet followed by dry in a few isolated areas. Nitrogen loss and leaf disease have added to the problem as summer has progressed. As harvest approaches, we need to consider how we are going to handle this crop. Here are a few thoughts:

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20

Aug

2015

E. Indiana & W. Ohio - Brent Minett, CCA

Scouting Tips To Add Bushels

Author: Brent Minett

It has been a challenging growing season and although you might feel like giving up, don’t! Here are few scouting tips that could add a few bushels to this year’s crop.

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20

Aug

2015

Ohio - Alex Johnson, CCA

Frequent Rains Causing Yellowing, Water Damage & Nitrogen Loss

Author: Alex Johnson

Frequent rains have made the 2015 growing season very challenging. Yellow corn and soybeans are something many farmers in Ohio are tired of looking at. As I’ve walked fields, I’ve seen increased disease pressure in corn and soybeans that came in even earlier than last year. These include gray leaf spot, northern corn leaf blight, and anthracnose in corn and frogeye leaf spot and septoria brown spot in soybeans. In many fields, disease was of secondary concern due to water damage and nitrogen loss.

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7

Aug

2015

Agronomy Update

Watch out for Waterhemp

Author: Alex Johnson

Keep an eye out for this weed! I’ve found waterhemp in many parts of the state, not just western Ohio.

As I have been asking farmers about this weed, I have estimated that over 90 percent of them don’t know how to identify it. It appears that we are in a similar position this year with waterhemp as we were with marestail five to seven years ago.

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4

Aug

2015

Agronomy Update

Closing Wheel Study and Disease Presence

Author: Alex Johnson

In this week’s video, I revisit the closing wheel study at Beck’s London Practical Farm Research® (PFR) site.The consequences of closing wheel choice go beyond emergence time – let’s look at the roots…

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24

Jul

2015

Agronomy Update

Testing UAV Usefulness in the Field

Author: Alex Johnson

This summer I’ve been using a quadcopter (UAV) to see how this tool can be helpful not just to me as an agronomist, but how it could benefit the everyday farmer as well. One of our interns, Kalen, has been exploring this same question while using his UAV at our Practical Farm Research (PFR)® facility in London, OH.

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20

Jul

2015

Ohio - Alex Johnson, CCA

Maintain Established Yield Potential

Author: Alex Johnson

Farmers are always looking forward. This time of year, crops are growing fast and the hardest work of the year is behind us. We are looking forward and keeping an eye on our fields to make sure the yield potential we established thus far is maintained. 

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20

Jul

2015

E. Indiana & W. Ohio - Brent Minett, CCA

Fungicide: To Spray or Not To Spray

Author: Brent Minett

Every year at this time farmers make the decision “to spray or not spray” their corn fields with fungicide. Understanding all the factors that need to be evaluated before full tassel helps eliminate confusion and hand wringing when the planes are ready and available. 

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8

Sep

2014

Agronomy Update

E.Indiana and Ohio: When Will My Corn Be Ready to Harvest?

Author: Alex Johnson

In today's Agronomy Update, Beck's agronomist Alex Johnson answers your questions about the upcoming corn harvest season. 

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4

Aug

2014

Agronomy Update

Is It Too Late to Spray Fungicides on Corn for NCLB?

Author: Mark Apelt

Most areas of Ohio and Indiana are in or have finished pollination. Some areas are past brown silk and are in the milk stage. Northern Corn Leaf Blight (NCLB) continues to spread and can easily be found in many fields in Indiana and Ohio.  Is it worthwhile to spray for this disease this late? 

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30

Jul

2014

Agronomy Update

White Mold, Soybean Fungicides, and Pollination

Author: Mark Apelt

White Mold
The last year we had a significant amount of white mold pressure was 2009. As you may (or may not) recall, 2009 was below average as far as temperatures were concerned. Highs were generally in the 70s and low 80s and lows were in the 50s and 60s during July. When we look at July 2014 so far, we are following a similar pattern.

Soybean Fungicides: Are they worth it?
We are approaching or are at the R3 stage of soybeans in many fields. The R3 stage is when there are pods developing on the lower nodes (there still will be flowers on the upper nodes as the stages in soybeans overlap). As a general rule, most fungicides are recommended at the R3 stage of growth. The question is, are they worth it?

Checking for Successful Pollination
Many areas are just beginning pollination while many other areas are completing pollination. How successful has pollination been this year? An easy way to determine is to do the shake test.

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17

Jul

2014

Agronomy Update

Corn Disease Update, Yellow Soybeans, and Good Wheat Yields

Author: Mark Apelt

Corn Disease Update
Last week we reported that Gray Leaf Spot was being found in many corn fields. This week there is Northern Corn Leaf Blight (NCLB) moving into some areas, especially those areas that had a rain early last week.

Cold Temperatures
The next few days are forecast to be well below average for temperatures. Usually this time of year we are talking about heat and drought and its effect on pollination.

Soybean Update
Although soybeans appear to be improving, there are still some areas where soybeans are staying yellow. Most of this yellowing has to do with water tolerance.

Wheat Yields
Most growers in our area have harvested wheat this year and many were surprised by how good the yields were. With the colder than normal winter and warmer than normal temperatures during grain fill, why were the yields so good?

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14

Jul

2014

Agronomy Update

E. Indiana and Ohio: Grey Leaf Spot Showing Up in Corn and Soybean Observations

Author: Mark Apelt

In the past week I have started to see some corn leaf diseases, specifically Gray leaf spot (GLS), in many corn fields. The GLS has been seen in both both corn/corn on corn after soybean rotations. The picture below was taken from a field that was corn after soybeans and was not pollinating yet. As you can see there was plenty of disease on this leaf.

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4

Jul

2014

Agronomy Update

E. Indiana and Ohio: Giant Ragweed and Marestail, Brittle Snap of Corn and Yellow Soybeans

Author: Mark Apelt

With all the rain we have received in certain areas there have been several farmers who have not had the opportunity to apply their post emerge herbicides. Many fields have giant ragweed and marestail escapes. Let’s talk about options for each.

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27

Jun

2014

Agronomy Update

E.Indiana and Ohio: Results of Planting Depth Study Were Quite Surprising

Author: Mark Apelt

During the past there has been much discussion and research regarding the ideal planting depth for corn. Surprisingly, there has been relatively little research done on the ideal planting depth for soybeans. If you do a web search for ideal planting depth of soybeans the results will vary from as shallow as ¾” deep to <2.5” deep. That is quite a range!

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12

Jun

2014

Agronomy Update

E. Indiana and Ohio: Yellow Beans, Rapid Growth Syndrome, and Floppy Corn

Author: Mark Apelt

Yellow Beans
While driving through Indiana and Ohio there are many soybean fields that are pale yellow in color. We have had adequate moisture and above average temperatures, so what is going on?

Rapid Growth Syndrome
Recently, there have been a few reports of corn that looks like it is getting wrapped up in itself. This is known as rapid growth syndrome or some call it twisted whorl syndrome.

Floppy Corn
There have been a few reports of corn that is leaning over after storms from last Wednesday. Genetics do not seem to play a role as many companies and hybrids have shown this symptom.

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