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Agronomy Talk

CENTRAL IOWA - WADE KENT, CCA

SDS in Iowa Soybean Fields

Published on Tuesday, August 23, 2016

One disease you may come across this season is Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS) in soybeans. SDS was first discovered in Arkansas in 1971 and occurs when the plant is infected by the fungal pathogen
Fusarium virguliforme. Though symptoms of the disease are not present until late in the growing season, the initial infection occurs after planting, following seedling emergence. SDS is most severe when soybeans are planted early into cool, wet soils.

Other factors that can contribute to SDS 
are heavily compacted and poorly drained soils. Initial symptoms of the disease are leaf yellowing and loss of the upper leaves. These symptoms tend to be present in wet or compacted areas of a field first. As the disease progresses, leaf veins will begin to yellow and eventually the leaf will die. 

There are no corrective actions that control SDS after the infection has occurred. Disease management of SDS can include changing or altering tillage practices, planting later, crop rotation and planting more tolerant varieties. Another great option that allows farmers to maintain an early planting date for soybeans is the use of the seed treatment ILeVO®, which has shown very good control of the disease and can greatly decrease the impact SDS has on soybean yield.

Author: Wade Kent

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